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PROPERTY FROM THE YADIN FAMILY COLLECTION

Reuven Rubin
1893-1974
RAMPARTS OF JERUSALEM
Estimate
200,000300,000
LOT SOLD. 277,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
17

PROPERTY FROM THE YADIN FAMILY COLLECTION

Reuven Rubin
1893-1974
RAMPARTS OF JERUSALEM
Estimate
200,000300,000
LOT SOLD. 277,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Israeli and International Art

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New York

Reuven Rubin
1893-1974
1893 - 1974
RAMPARTS OF JERUSALEM
signed Rubin and in Hebrew (lower left)
oil on canvas
24 by 28 3/4 in.
61 by 73 cm.
Painted in 1924.
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Provenance

Professor and Mrs Yigal Yadin, Israel

Exhibited

Tel Aviv, Rubin Museum, Rubin Jerusalem Landscapes In Honor of Israel's 40th Anniversary, 1988, n.n., illustrated in color in the exhibition catalogue

Literature

Susan Wilkinson, Reuven Rubin, New York, page 131, no. 96, illustrated

Catalogue Note

Painted in 1924, Ramparts of Jerusalem depicts a view of a lone figure carrying a basket on his head, walking beside a burdened donkey along a walled winding path leading up to the Old City of Jerusalem. The bright colors and Mediterranean light contribute to this picturesque view inviting the viewer to relive the primitive, Oriental atmosphere of early 20th Century in this holy city.

Carmela Rubin discusses Reuven Rubin's Jerusalem landscapes and notes: "It is interesting to compare the landscapes of Jerusalem with the Tel-Aviv paintings of the twenties. Rubin documents Tel-Aviv from within, focusing on daily life in this secular city. On the other hand, Jerusalem is captured on his canvases from a distance - Jerusalem is seen almost always in a wide panoramic view, with the hills around, the wall surrounding it and the paths climbing up to the city. The city is remote, elevated, enclosed within its walls. The artist stands back, regarding the city from the distance demanded by his humility. Stylistically Rubin paints Jerusalem in the same naïve - primitive manner typical of his work during the twenties. In the case of his Jerusalem landscapes this style serves to express the archaic, the spiritual, beyond the realities of daily life. Nevertheless the early Jerusalem paintings are rich in detail despite the distant perspective and the broad vista. There is an unreal sense of depth and space which emphasizes the feeling of exultation." (Carmela Rubin, Rubin Jerusalem Landscapes In Honour of Israel's 40th Anniversary, Rubin Museum, Tel Aviv, 1988).

Israeli and International Art

|
New York