175
175

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION IN ISRAEL

Jankel Adler
1895-1949
SEATED WOMAN
JUMP TO LOT
175

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION IN ISRAEL

Jankel Adler
1895-1949
SEATED WOMAN
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Israeli and International Art

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Jankel Adler
1895-1949
1895 - 1949
SEATED WOMAN
signed Adler (top right)
oil on canvas
39 3/8 by 23 5/8 in.
100 by 60 cm.
Painted in 1928.
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Exhibited

Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Masters of Modern Art , 1982, no.1
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Jankel Adler, 1985-1986, page 85, no. 26, illustrated in color in the exhibition catalogue

Catalogue Note

Born in Lodz, Poland, Adler moved to Germany in 1913 where he established himself as a significant force in German painting of the 1920's, participating in every important Expressionist exhibition. His studies with Gustav Wiethuechter, at the School of Arts and Crafts in Barmen, influenced his persistent interest in the technique of painting and the exploration of new textures. In 1933 he was forced to leave Germany and, after wandering through France, Poland, the Balkans and Spain he finally settled in Glasgow in 1941, and then in London in 1943, where he exerted a major influence on postwar British painting.

Adler's work of the late 1920's was heavily indebted to the influence of Picasso and Cubism as well Constructivism, German Expressionism and Klee, with whom he taught at the Dusseldorf Staatlich Kunstakademie.  Seated Woman of 1928 is typical of paintings of this period,  dominated by the static human figure of the old woman,  her facial features etched out in heavy impasto, her limbs restrained and monumental.  The composition is carefully planned and built upon the contrast of different surface textures and the color scheme veers towards the monochromatic.

'Some critics have remarked upon the affinity between the grave seriousness of Jankel Adler's figures, his firmly constructed compositions, the deep resonant colours of his paintings, and the strength and severity of the Jewish orthodox religion in which he was raised. Some see in Adler's paintings a blending of the mathematical clarity of the Talmud with the mysticism of Cabbala. Many of the portraits he painted are of members of his family, and often he used traditional Jewish themes or introduced Hebrew letters in his work. (A. Kampf, Chagall to Kitaj, Jewish Experience in 20th Century Art (exhibition catalogue), London, 1990, p.87)

Israeli and International Art

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New York