277
277
A fine and rare pair of Louis XV ormolu three-branch wall lights
Mid 18th Century, attributed to Jacques Caffiéri
Estimate
140,000180,000
JUMP TO LOT
277
A fine and rare pair of Louis XV ormolu three-branch wall lights
Mid 18th Century, attributed to Jacques Caffiéri
Estimate
140,000180,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important French and Continental Furniture, European Ceramics and Carpets

|
New York

A fine and rare pair of Louis XV ormolu three-branch wall lights
Mid 18th Century, attributed to Jacques Caffiéri

each with a voluted backplate supporting three intertwined voluted candle branches; the whole cast with foliate motifs, sunflowers, roses and petals, with deeply curved leaf-cast drip pans and leafy nozzles.  Pierced for wiring.

 


height 26 in.; width 16¾ in.
66 cm; 42.5 cm
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Catalogue Note

This pair of wall lights is virtually identical to a pair formerly in the Alexander collection, sold, Christie's, New York, April 30, 1999, lot 59.  The lower half of the backplate is identical in every detail with flowerheads, leaf tips and open scrolls; the arrangement and most of the details of the three intertwined candle branches is also identical, differing only in that the Alexander pair is pierced on the lower scroll whereas the present lot presents a flat molded surface applied with a floral spray; the drip pans and nozzles on the present pair are more deeply cast and chased.

The Alexander pair is struck several times with the C couronné poinçon precisely dating it to c. 1745-49 and is attributed to the sculpteur, fondeur et ciseleur du roi Jacques Caffiéri (1678-1755), probably with the assistance of his son, Philippe (1714-1774).  This attribution is based on similarities with a set of four wall lights which was supplied to Madame Infante, Louise-Elizabeth of France, duchesse de Parma for the Palazzo di Colorno.  Now in the J. Paul Getty Museum (G. Wilson & C. Hess, Summary Catalogue of European Decorative Arts in the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, 2001, no. 170, pp. 84-85) and dated c. 1751, the similarity with the present pair lies in the design of the three intertwined candle branches.  The flanking branches are fitted with simple voluted drip pans and nozzles, the central branch however has a different, larger, more deeply cast drip pan which appears to be virtually identical to the drip pans on the present pair.  Although the lower part of the backplate is of different design to the present pair, the Getty examples incorporate very similarly modelled flowerheads and foliate motifs.

Important French and Continental Furniture, European Ceramics and Carpets

|
New York