278
278
EDWARD ROPER
ENGLISH
ABORIGINAL CORROBOREE
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 31,200 AUD
JUMP TO LOT
278
EDWARD ROPER
ENGLISH
ABORIGINAL CORROBOREE
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 31,200 AUD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Australian Art Including Selected International Works

|
Melbourne

EDWARD ROPER
1830-1909
ENGLISH
ABORIGINAL CORROBOREE
Signed lower left
Watercolour, gouache and pencil on paper
30 by 50 cm
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Provenance

Private collection, United Kingdom

Exhibited

Colonial Fine Art Exhibition: Exhibition of Australian and New Zealand, American & Canadian Oil Paintings and Water Colour Drawing, Burlington Gallery, London, under the patronage of Sir Saul Samuel KCMG, between 1882-1886, cat. 16, titled Big one Corroboree\

Catalogue Note

A indefatigable traveller, the artist, illustrator and printmaker Edward Roper spent extended periods of his life in both Canada and Australia, with periodic returns to England and a visit to New Zealand in 1873.  Various exhibitions and publication from these journeys saw him elected a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society in 1889.

His Australian sojourns were in the mid-1850's and early 1870's, and while resident here he not only illustrated topical subjects for newspapers and periodicals, but also sketched a variety of typical-exotic colonial scenes, including kangaroo and emu hunting, gold prospecting, tree felling, cattle yarding, bullock driving and picnicking in a fern gully.  These field studies provided the core imagery for Roper's entries in later, metropolitan exhibitions, notable Exhibition of Australian and New Zealand, American and Canadian Oil Painting and Water Colour Drawings (Burlington gallery, London, 1886), and the Exhibition of Pictures of Our Colonies (Great Assembly Hall, London, 1893).

The present group of works is representative of Roper's broad geographical interests and of his amiable brand of ethnography.

This work was described in the catalogue as 'a festival amongst the Australian Blacks', but the subject has not been specifically identified.  In broad outline Roper's watercolour is fairly typical of nineteenth century representations of corroborees, with the dance taking place in a fire-lit clearing and with both Indigenous and non-Indigenous spectactors in the foreground.  The broad general location can be suggested, however.  Roper is known to have spent time in the Wimmera district - Ararat, Stawell and the Grampians appear in several titles - and the knob-ended 'leangle' club held by one of the figures on the left is a weapon peculiar to the West Victorian tribes.

Important Australian Art Including Selected International Works

|
Melbourne