77
77

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE CALIFORNIA COLLECTION

Gustav Stickley
A RARE THREE-PANEL "ROSE MOTIF" SCREEN
Estimate
30,00050,000
LOT SOLD. 33,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
77

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE CALIFORNIA COLLECTION

Gustav Stickley
A RARE THREE-PANEL "ROSE MOTIF" SCREEN
Estimate
30,00050,000
LOT SOLD. 33,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Gustav Stickley
A RARE THREE-PANEL "ROSE MOTIF" SCREEN
oak with "Craftsman canvas" panels and linen appliqué
central panel: 55 3/8 x 18 1/2 in. (140.7 x 47 cm)
side panels: 54 x 18 1/2 in. (137.2 x 47 cm)
ca. 1905
executed by the Craftsman Workshops of Gustav Stickley, Eastwood, NY
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Barry Sanders, A Complex Fate:  Gustav Stickley and the Craftsman Movement, New York, 1996, pl. 3

Provenance

Estate of Gurdon Wattles, Hollywood, CA

Literature

"Screen:  Rose Motif," The Craftsman, February 1905, p. XVIII (for a period photograph and description of this model)
"Screen:  Wild Rose Motif," The Craftsman, February 1905, p. XX (for a period photograph and description of a related variant of this screen displaying a different rose motif)
Robert Judson Clark, ed., The Arts and Crafts Movement in America, 1876-1916, Princeton, 1972, p. 39 (for an example of this model in the collection of The Gamble House, USC)
Stephen Gray and Robert Edwards, eds., Collected Works of Gustav Stickley, New York, 1981, pp. 99 and 125 (for the related "Wild Rose Motif" screen, identified as model no. 81)
Tod M. Volpe and Beth Cathers, Treasures of the American Arts and Crafts Movement:  1890-1920, New York, 1988, p. 38 (for an example of this model formerly in the collection of James and Janeen Marrin, now in the collection of Crabtree Farms)

Catalogue Note

In the February 1905 issue of Stickley's Craftsman magazine, two appliqued textile screens were introduced displaying variations on the rose motif.  Stickley's use of these conventionalized floral devices was likely inspired from the progressive designs of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and other Glasgow sources of the period.  The screen presently offered was identifed as the "Rose Motif," and a detailed account of its colors and fabric were included by the editor:  "Never were Craftsman fabrics or Craftsman needlework more charmingly employed than in the screen here shown which we have called "the Rose Motif."  The soft olive green of the panel color suggests the deep tones of the hazel wood of which the frame is made, and in contrast we have introduced, as the appliqué of the rose form, a bloom linen of richest gold--this again finding a place in the little space enclosed at the base of the stem lines.  The tapering leaves of the rose, singularly decorative in line, are carried out in an appliqué of this clear green and outlined in a golden brown which also is again repeated in the stem lines, and the markings of the petal forms of the flower."  

Only a few examples of this rare textile screen are presently known.  The mate to this screen, which also came from the Wattles Estate, is now in the collection of Crabtree Farms.  Another example of the model is in the collection of The Gamble House, University of Southern California.  

Important 20th Century Design

|
New York