91
91
A massive Meissen group emblematic of the union of the Crimea with Russia
second half 19th century
Estimate
12,00018,000
LOT SOLD. 38,400 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
91
A massive Meissen group emblematic of the union of the Crimea with Russia
second half 19th century
Estimate
12,00018,000
LOT SOLD. 38,400 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine British and European Ceramics & Glass

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London

A massive Meissen group emblematic of the union of the Crimea with Russia
second half 19th century
after the model by Johann Carl Schönheit and Christian Gottfried Jüchtzer, depicting Russia, personified as a classical figure seated on a raised oval base with an eagle to one side symbolising her power, gesturing towards the kneeling figure emblematic of the Crimea, holding a shield inscibed 'TAVRIA', behind her a triangular column and between them a winged female figure with flames on the top of her head, probably Pax or Concordia, the three palm trees at the rear each applied with a detachable crown of palm fronds, the largest hung with an oval relief portrait medallion of Catherine the Great and a long, trailing flowers swag, mounted on a giltwood oval base with a Vitruvian scroll border
crossed swords mark in underglaze-blue
76cm., 29 7/8 in. high
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Catalogue Note

This group was modelled by Schönheit and Jüchtzer between 1783-86 following a commission from the Russian Court, and possibly the Czarina herself, marking the annexation of the Crimea in 1783. It was executed in biscuit porcelain - the largest ever group of its kind - and was probably delivered in or shortly after its completion in 1786. In his biography of Count Camillo Marcolini of 1877, Friedrich August Freiherr Ô-Byrn reported that "an allegory of the Empress Catherine II as the victor of Tauria" could be seen in 1786 at the exhibition of the Dresden Academy. It is not known whether the original group has survived in Russia, though a second version was made which entered the Royal Porcelain Collection in Dresden in 1779, for which see Ulrich Pietsch (pub.), Meißen für die Zaren, no.215.

Fine British and European Ceramics & Glass

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London