111
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e - Joyce, James.
AUTOGRAPH NOTE SIGNED WITH INITIALS, TO EZRA POUND
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111
e - Joyce, James.
AUTOGRAPH NOTE SIGNED WITH INITIALS, TO EZRA POUND
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

English Literature, History, Children's Books and Illustrations

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e - Joyce, James.
AUTOGRAPH NOTE SIGNED WITH INITIALS, TO EZRA POUND
informing him that the Irish tenor John Sullivan will perform in Guillaume Tell at the Teatro Carlo Felice, Genoa, on Boxing Day, and encouraging him to attend ("...I have asked him to send you two passes. I hope you will go and hear him..."), with a typed reply by Pound on the verso noting that the tickets had not arrived ("...an damifi'm going ennyhow..."), 2 pages, oblong 8vo, torn from a spiral-bound notebook, [early 1930s]
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Catalogue Note

Joyce was a wildly enthusiastic supporter of John Sullivan, a tenor whom he felt was unfairly marginalised in the opera world. Joyce's principal method of supporting the singer was to encourage, bully, and generally bestir his friends - including, of course, many of the great names in Modernism - to come to the opera and cheer Sullivan (Joyce's own favoured rallying cry was "Bravo Cork!") then meet him for a drink afterwards. Arnold in Rossini's Guillaume Tell was one of Sullivan's greatest roles, and provided Joyce with fine opportunities for publicity. On one occasion, according to a Parisian newspaper report, at the conclusion of an aria: "a man in one of the boxes, whom many recognized as James Joyce ... dramatically leaned forward, raised a pair of heavy dark glasses from his eyes, and exclaimed: 'Merci, mon Dieu, pour ce miracle. Apres vingt ans, je revois la lumiere.'" (Quoted in Ellman, James Joyce, p.368) From the evidence of this letter, however, it does not appear that Ezra Pound was won over by Joyce's enthusiasm.

English Literature, History, Children's Books and Illustrations

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London