107
107
Boyd, Ernest.
IRELAND'S LITERARY RENAISSANCE. NEW YORK: ALFRED A. KNOPF, 1922
Estimate
5,0008,000
LOT SOLD. 3,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
107
Boyd, Ernest.
IRELAND'S LITERARY RENAISSANCE. NEW YORK: ALFRED A. KNOPF, 1922
Estimate
5,0008,000
LOT SOLD. 3,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

English Literature, History, Children's Books and Illustrations

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Boyd, Ernest.
IRELAND'S LITERARY RENAISSANCE. NEW YORK: ALFRED A. KNOPF, 1922
8vo, first edition, presentation copy, inscribed by james joyce to his brother stanislaus ("To | Stannie | Jim | Paris | 6 September 1923"), original green cloth, preserved in specially made folding green cloth case and matching quarter green morocco slipcase, minor wear to edges of binding
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Catalogue Note

James Joyce's younger brother Stanislaus (born Dublin, 17 December 1884, died Trieste, 16 June, "Bloomsday", 1955) arrived in Trieste in October 1905 and for the next fifteen years acted as a continual source of funds for his brother's family, as well as his protector, property-finder and--at times--literary secretary and curator. Stanislaus also often found himself rescuing his older brother after bouts of heavy drinking, slinging him on his back and carrying him through the streets of the Old City (see Brenda Maddox, Nora), and despairing over his sibling's financial recklessness. It was to Stanislaus that Joyce made the first recorded reference to a "Ulysses" story, in a postcard from Rome of 30 September 1906. Stanislaus's memoir, My Brother's Keeper, appeared posthumously in 1958. The bulk of his huge archive was sold to Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, in 1957. Further books and letters (including the extraordinary first letter in the series of highly charged erotic correspondence between James Joyce and his wife Nora) were sold at Sotheby's London on 8 July 2004. 

Pp.402-412 of Boyd's book are devoted to a discussion of Joyce's work up to that time, with a strong emphasis on the Irishness of his writing ("...no Irish writer is more Irish than Joyce; none shows more unmistakeably the imprint of his race and traditions..."), the "harsh and disillusioned guise" under which eroticism appears in his work, but also acknowledging the extraordinarily valuable and daring exeperiment of Ulysses.  A number of letters by Joyce to Boyd have survived. On 30 December 1920, for instance, Joyce writes to him on behalf of M. LaMallide, editor of La Vie des Peuples, asking for three articles on the Irish novel, Irish theatre, and the Irish economic question ("...I have taken the liberty of forwarding the request to you as the recognized historian of the Irish literary movement...": Letters of James Joyce, vol.3, pp.35-36).

English Literature, History, Children's Books and Illustrations

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