718
718
Shi Jinsong B. 1969
NA ZHA'S CRADLE
Estimate
450,000550,000
LOT SOLD. 667,500 HKD
JUMP TO LOT
718
Shi Jinsong B. 1969
NA ZHA'S CRADLE
Estimate
450,000550,000
LOT SOLD. 667,500 HKD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Contemporary Chinese Art (Part II)

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Hong Kong

Shi Jinsong B. 1969
B. 1969
NA ZHA'S CRADLE

Executed in 2005.


stainless steel
61 by 81 by 62cm.; 24 by 31 7/8 by 24 3/8 in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Catalogue Note

A key figure in Chinese mythology and folklore that also appears in various guises in dramas and in novels such as The Journey to the West, Na Zha was originally an Immortal named Da Luo in the court of the Jade Emperor, Ruler of Heaven. Sent down to earth by the Jade Emperor, Da Luo was introduced into the womb of the wife of Emperor Li Jing. Reborn as Na Zha, he entered the world wearing a gold bracelet (the Horizon of Heaven and Earth) and wearing a pair of red silk trousers. It was clear he was a remarkable child! By the time he was six years old he was six feet tall and a force to be reckoned with.

Problems began when he went to bathe in the East Sea. So great was the heat emanating from his red trousers that the ocean began to boil, a fact not unoticed in the palace of the East Sea Dragon King. After a series of encounters Na Zha finally killed the Dragon King as he was about to enter the Gate of Heaven to complain to the Jade King about Na Zha's behaviour. Some time later Na Zha committed suicide in order to save his parents from the wrath of the three remaining Dragon Kings (of the West Sea, the North Sea and the South Sea).

Reborn from a lotus flower, the sixteen feet tall prince was finally reconciled with his father and they joined forces to slay demons. Recognizing his virtues, the Jade Emperor appointed Na Zha Generalissimo of the Thirty-six Celestial Officiers, Grand Marshal of the Skies and the Gate of Heaven. The naughty boy survived to become an immortal whose birthday is celebrated even today.

Excerpt from the article Na Zha Baby Boutique, written by John Tancock.

Contemporary Chinese Art (Part II)

|
Hong Kong