645
645
A fine and rare Russian neoclassical ormolu-mounted birch, fruitwood and marquetry commode
circa 1780
Estimate
200,000300,000
LOT SOLD. 337,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
645
A fine and rare Russian neoclassical ormolu-mounted birch, fruitwood and marquetry commode
circa 1780
Estimate
200,000300,000
LOT SOLD. 337,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Ariane Dandois: European Furniture, Paintings & Asian Art

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New York

A fine and rare Russian neoclassical ormolu-mounted birch, fruitwood and marquetry commode
circa 1780
one drawer with the inscription in pencil 17 may 1780.
height 34 1/4 in.; width 45 in.; depth 24 1/4 in.
87 cm; 114 cm; 61.5 cm
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Literature

Aurelia and Anne Lovreglio, Dictionnaire des Mobiliers et des Objets d'art du Moyen Age au XXI Siécle

Catalogue Note

The use of wood marquetry and parquetry in Russia was popular throughout the 18th century and is discussed in U.V. Fomin, The Art of Marquetry in Eighteenth Century Russia, Moscow, 1989, p. 28.  Employed by architects such as Bartolommeo Rastrelli for the parquetry floors of the Imperial Palaces of Peterhof, Tsarskoye Selo and the Winter Palace at St. Petersburg, there were also a number of furniture makers whose work in marquetry is celebrated today.  These include Christian Meyer, the craftsmen from the Okhta settlement in St. Petersburg, Nikifor Vasilyev and Matei Veretennikov.  Of these, Vasilyev is best known for his use of architectural marquetry, in particular on a desk dating from the late 1770s/early 1780s depicting Kuskovo Palace, where he worked for Count and Countess Sheremetyev (see, U.V. Fomin, op. cit. pp. 80-87).  This shows similarities to the marquetry panels on this lot.  Other pieces thought to be by this maker and showing architectural views are illustrated, U.V. Fomin, op. cit. pp. 64-67 (showing a panorama of the Moscow Kremlin), 70-71, and 97-99.

Ariane Dandois: European Furniture, Paintings & Asian Art

|
New York