188
188
an important pair of gilt and patinated bronze seven light torchÈres
Paris, circa 1870
Estimate
50,00070,000
JUMP TO LOT
188
an important pair of gilt and patinated bronze seven light torchÈres
Paris, circa 1870
Estimate
50,00070,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

19th Century Furniture, Sculpture, Ceramics and Works of Art Including Property Formerly from the Palacio Ferreyra, Argentina

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New York

an important pair of gilt and patinated bronze seven light torchÈres
Paris, circa 1870

composed of a classical urn issuing candlearms sitting on a red brecciatic marble platform and raised on a similarly decorated turned columnar pedestal cast with entwined acanthus leaves. 


height 8 ft. 3 1/2 in.
252.6 cm
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Literature

Jonathan Meyer, Great Exhibitions, London, New York, Paris, Philadelphia, 1851-1900, Antique Collector's club, Woodbridge, 2006, p. 141, pl. D60.

Catalogue Note

This pair of vase candelabra are almost identical to the vase and column shown by the firm of A.Lacarrière at the International Exhibition in London in 1862. The exhibited version simply lacks the candle branches. On this evidence they can be attributed with some certainty to Lacarrière. The firm of Auguste Lacarrière sent exhibits to the the first International Exhibition in London in 1851. At that time they seem to have occupied two Paris addresses, 9 rue St Elizabeth, and 55 rue Meslay as well as having another outlet in Limoges. They are recorded as showing 'specimens of lustres, sconces, chandeliers, medallions, etc'. By the 1862 exhibition they were only recorded at the Sainte Elizabeth address and showed,  'Appareils à gaz de fonte , de zinc et de bronze.' Nevertheless their exhibit was highly praised and the business, now A.Lacarrière, Père et Fils et Cie,  received a medal for 'good design and fabrication'. J. B.Waring also comments, 'The bronze-gilt candelabrum in the Greek style by Messrs. Lacarrière and Co. was remarkable for the elegance of its form and the justness of proportions affording a high idea of the present state of manufacturing art in Paris.' ( J.B.Waring Masterpieces of Industrial Art and Sculpture 1862, pl. 257.) It is interesting that it was described as in the Greek style at the time; we would tend to think of them as in Byzantine style today. This confusion underlines the proliferation of revival styles during the period and the relative lack of understanding of the distinction between ancient styles.

19th Century Furniture, Sculpture, Ceramics and Works of Art Including Property Formerly from the Palacio Ferreyra, Argentina

|
New York