47
47
A Stainless Steel Military Sweep Seconds Wristwatch, IWC, 'Mark XI', Circa 1950
Estimate
5,0007,000
JUMP TO LOT
47
A Stainless Steel Military Sweep Seconds Wristwatch, IWC, 'Mark XI', Circa 1950
Estimate
5,0007,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

A Stainless Steel Military Sweep Seconds Wristwatch, IWC, 'Mark XI', Circa 1950
nickel lever movement, monometallic compensation balance, precision regulator, metal dust cap, black matte dial, luminescent triangular and baton indexes, white Arabic numerals, luminescent hands, sweep seconds, stainless steel water-resistant-type circular case with smooth bezel and brushed case, solid strap bars, engraved military inscriptions to the screw back, case, dial and movement signed International Watch Co. 
diameter 36mm
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Catalogue Note

IWC began producing this model, the Mark XI, during World War II and would continue making it for dacades after. In the present IWC production line, the Mark XV is a slight variation on this watch.

The present example is interesting because the dial bears the admiralty arrow, or 'Broad Arrow', as well as the 'Circle-T' symbols.

The Circle-T was used to designate that the luminescent paint on the dial contained traces of the chemical tritium. Scientists would ultimately find that tritium is mildly toxic, at which time many watch companies would switch from tritium to rhodium. For this reason, watches with the Circle-T are more unusual.

The Admiralty Arrow is used by the British government to designate state property. In this case, as the British military commissioned the watch originally, it was stamped or printed with the Broad Arrow on the dial, the outside of the case back and the movement.

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