3
3
Chandra Mandala
distemper on cloth
Nepal
Estimate
60,00080,000
LOT SOLD. 352,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
3
Chandra Mandala
distemper on cloth
Nepal
Estimate
60,00080,000
LOT SOLD. 352,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Jucker Collection of Himalayan Paintings

|
New York

Chandra Mandala
distemper on cloth
Nepal
The paubha depicting the mandala of the moon god Chandra seated on a chariot flanked by elegantly dressed figures holding the stems of lotus flowers, with his charioteer Ambara holding the reins of seven geese, surrounded by forms of the moon god within and without the white eight point star structure, a stupa above, surrounded by a ring of deities representing the Twenty-eight Stars, the outer circle divided by palm trees into eight scenes relating to the cardinal points, a multi-coloured ring of flames enclosing the mandala, with Buddhist deities and auspicious emblems at each corner set within scrolling vine against a flower-filled background, a register of Buddhas above and the five Pancharaksha deities below flanked by the donor family to the right and a Vajracharya performing ritual to the left.


24 by 20 3/4 in. (61 by 53 cm.)

14th/15th Century


Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Literature

Hugo E. Kreijger, Kathmandu Valley Painting, The Jucker Collection, Boston, 1999, p. 34, no. 4.

Catalogue Note

This exceptional Nepalese mandala painting has much in common with the Newari style of the celebrated Yuan (1279-1368) kesi mandalas, see Watt and Wardwell, 1997, pp. 101-3, no. 26, a Tibetan Hevajra mandala from a private Swiss collection, see Pal, 2003, p. 200, pl. 130, and the superb series of late fourteenth century Tibetan Sakya mandalas see Heller, 2004, pp. 69-73, thus demonstrating the extended influence of the Newari artistic tradition epitomised in this paubha. The painting remains one of the finest Nepalese mandalas of the period. Compare elements in this painting, such as crowns and jewelry and chariot design, with those of a 14th century Surya mandala in the Zimmerman Family Collection; see Pal, 1991, p. 70, no. 33. Chandra mandala paintings were especially popular in Nepal in this period, being commissioned at important and auspicious moments in the lives of both Buddhist and Hindu patrons. For another Chandra mandala in the Zimmerman Family Collection, see ibid, pp. 72-3, no. 35, and others in the Jucker Collection, see lots 5 and 13 below.

The Jucker Collection of Himalayan Paintings

|
New York