115
115

Rasputina, Marya (daughter of Grigory Yefimovich Rasputin).

AUTOGRAPH MANUSCRIPT DIARY KEPT FROM SEPTEMBER 1914 UNTIL NOVEMBER 1916, CONTAINING SEVERAL REFERENCES TO RASPUTIN UP UNTIL A MONTH BEFORE HIS ASSASSINATION
Estimate
2,0003,000
LOT SOLD. 2,160 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
115

Rasputina, Marya (daughter of Grigory Yefimovich Rasputin).

AUTOGRAPH MANUSCRIPT DIARY KEPT FROM SEPTEMBER 1914 UNTIL NOVEMBER 1916, CONTAINING SEVERAL REFERENCES TO RASPUTIN UP UNTIL A MONTH BEFORE HIS ASSASSINATION
Estimate
2,0003,000
LOT SOLD. 2,160 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Russian Books

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London

Rasputina, Marya (daughter of Grigory Yefimovich Rasputin).

AUTOGRAPH MANUSCRIPT DIARY KEPT FROM SEPTEMBER 1914 UNTIL NOVEMBER 1916, CONTAINING SEVERAL REFERENCES TO RASPUTIN UP UNTIL A MONTH BEFORE HIS ASSASSINATION

unsigned, but with Marya's name, that of her father [Grigory Rasputin] and sister Varya all contained in the text, in Russian, written in a youthful hand in black ink, some passages (entered during train journeys) in pencil, about her father's role as a friend of the Tsar, his moodiness and reported threats on his life, describing wartime train-journeys, meeting and talking with wounded soldiers; Marya also reports meeting with the Tsarina and the Grand Duchesses Olga and Tatyana, and discusses her life at high school, her romantic infatuations and flirtations and her social engagements, including going to hear Chaliapin sing

84 pages, 4to (c. 220 x 175mm.), a ruled exercise book, with drawings and doodles in pencil at the end, black cloth wrappers, numbered ("No.1") on the inside cover, [Petrograd and elsewhere], 24 September 1914-1 November 1916, a leaf apparently removed at the start of the volume, and another becoming loose


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Catalogue Note

This is a lively and sometimes poignant account of Marya Rasputina's life in Petrograd during the First World War, with significant references to her father, Grigory Yefimovich Rasputin (1872-1916) and the effects of war. Rasputin was assassinated in December 1916.

As she relates at the start of her diary, Marya Grigoryevna Rasputina was born in 1899 at Pokrovskoye (in the Tobolsk region).  She reports a demonstration against Rasputin in October 1914, negative comments made about him at her school, and his frequent bad moods. Marya refers to Rasputin as "Papa" ("...My father has an important role because the Tsar knows and loves him...") and he is named in the entry for 17 February 1916 as "Grigory Yevfimovich".  This is in the context of the occasion when the police interrogated the husband of a friend ("...Ivan Ivanovich was standing there as white as a sheet, it turns out they were carrying out a search... because [he] is close to Grigory Yevfimovich... my hands are still shaking from fear... all in all the day was a real nightmare..."). There was also a more direct threat against Rasputin himself: 

...Today everyone is in a terrible mood, everyone is waiting for something terrible to happen. There are rumours that papa is going to be killed in the next nine days. For this reason a kind of black cloud hung over everyone... I just went into the chapel, they were singing for the repose of the souls of the dead, I placed a candle and I really started to feel terrible... Papa is going round with black looks... Of course I think that they are trying to frighten him [by saying that] they will kill him, I would go mad; and he still goes around visiting people. How fearless he is... God help us... [6 February 1916]

Marya was evidently a lively and engaging girl. She gives an account of life at high school with friends and her love for her physics teacher. She had an active social life, including going to the theatre, cinema, hearing Chaliapin, and reading “On the Eve” by Turgenev.  She was also adventurous. There is an extraordinary account of a trip on a hospital train with nurses attending war wounded, including a lengthy description of the Easter celebrations held in the carriages. Later, she became preoccupied with thoughts of getting married, to a certain Simonik, known to her father. She is frank about her youthful infatuations; she was evidently attracted by and attractive to men. She reports missing a history class, a secret drinking session with friends at school, but was also compassionate about the wounded soldiers, and frequently worried about her father and Simonik (who went off to fight).

...All day I was in wagons No 1 and 2 looking after the wounded... There were a lot of praying soldiers and officers... sadness was visible on their faces. They were probably all at that moment thinking of their family and friends... there was paskha and kulich [sweet cheese and Easter cake] for the wounded, nevertheless they were still moaning... I really pitied the poor things, some of the wounded had tears in their eyes, but they didn’t want to show that they felt like crying. Now I realise what wounded means and how much they suffer... [21-22 March 1916] 

Russian Books

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