70
70
* Domenico Maria Canuti
Bologna 1620 - 1684
A FLYING ANGEL SEEING FROM BEHIND
Estimate
7,0009,000
LOT SOLD. 16,800 USD
JUMP TO LOT
70
* Domenico Maria Canuti
Bologna 1620 - 1684
A FLYING ANGEL SEEING FROM BEHIND
Estimate
7,0009,000
LOT SOLD. 16,800 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Old Master Drawings

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New York

* Domenico Maria Canuti
Bologna 1620 - 1684
BOLOGNA 1620 - 1684
A FLYING ANGEL SEEING FROM BEHIND
bears pencil attribution on the mount, in the hand of John Skippe: Benedetto Luti and old numberings: N39 and 24, and in another hand on the verso of the mount: Mrs Rayner Wood, Old Colwall, Malvern
black and red chalk with brown wash heightened with white chalk on gray paper 
367 by 289mm; 14 7/16 by 11 3/8 in
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Provenance

John Skippe;
by descent to Edward Holland, Mrs Rayner Wood, and Edward Holland-Martin;
his sale, London, Christie's, 20-21 November 1958, lot 125 (as Benedetto Luti)

Exhibited

London, Royal Academy, Exhibition of 17th Century Art in Europe, 1938, no. 482 (as Luti)

Catalogue Note

This study of an angel is related to Canuti's fresco decorations in the library of the monastery of San Michele in Bosco, now the Istituto Rizzoli.  The new library was commissioned and paid for by Abbot Taddeo Pepoli, who felt the monastery did not have an adequate space for such a purpose, 'corrispondente alla nobiltá delle altre sue parti'. The work on this library, which which would have included scientific instruments as well as books, started in 1677. It was still intact with all its furnishings in 1788, but eleven years later the Order was suppressed, and from 1804 to 1824 the buildings were used as a prison. Fortunately the fresco decoration did not suffer, and is today in a good state of preservation.

The present figure appears on the central ceiling in the first room of three frescoed by Canuti; the subject of the fresco is La Concordia sulla Terra (see Simonetta Stagni, Domenico Maria Canuti, Rimini 1988, p. 183, reproduced fig. 40a). An early pen and ink study in Besançon (Stagni, op. cit., fig. 42) shows that prior to conceiving this audaciously posed youthful male, Canuti planned that a more conventional putto should hover above the Temperaments, depicted below.  Although the pentimento next to the foot in the present drawing demonstrates that Canuti was still in the process of revising aspects of this figure, in other respects it appears in the final fresco largely as here.  The artist did, however, make significant changes to the drapery, rendering the figure rather less likely to distract the Olivetan monks from their studies.  

Old Master Drawings

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