31
31

PROPERTY OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

Chaim Soutine
PAYSAGE AVEC DES PERSONNAGES
Estimate
1,500,0002,000,000
JUMP TO LOT
31

PROPERTY OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

Chaim Soutine
PAYSAGE AVEC DES PERSONNAGES
Estimate
1,500,0002,000,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale

|
New York

Chaim Soutine
1893-1943
PAYSAGE AVEC DES PERSONNAGES
Signed Soutine (lower right)
Oil on canvas
24 1/4 by 19 3/4 in.
61.5 by 50 cm
Painted circa 1922.
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Provenance

Paul Guillaume, Paris

Private Collection, England

Alex Maguy, Paris (acquired from the above in 1960)

M. Knoedler & Co., Inc., New York (by 1960)

Jacques Lindon, New York (acquired from the above in 1960)

Mr. Peter I. B. Lavan, New York (acquired in 1960)

Acquired as a gift from the above in 1964

Exhibited

London, Redfern Gallery

London, Storran Gallery, Twelve Paintings by Soutine, 1938

Lugano, Museo d'Arte Moderna, Chaim Soutine, 1995, no. 47

Literature

Metropolitan Museum of Art, French Paintings, vol. III, New York, 1967, illustrated p. 243

Pierre Courthion, Soutine, Peintre du déchirant, Paris, 1972, illustrated p. 227E (titled Le Thé sur la terrasse de Vence)

Nishimura Toshio (ed.), Les Grands Maîtres de la peinture moderne.  L'Ecole de Paris, Tokyo, 1973, no. 49, illustrated p. 122

Maurice Tuchman, Esti Dunow and Klaus Perls, Chaim Soutine (1893-1943), Catalogue Raisonné, vol. I, Cologne, 1993, no. 102, illustrated p. 225 (with dimensions 66 by 54.6 cm)

Catalogue Note

 

Painted in Céret circa 1922, Paysage avec des personnages is one of the extraordinary series of landscapes that Soutine painted in the small town in the French Pyrenées discovered by the Cubists before the First World War (see fig. 1). Away from the architectural grandeur of Paris and the formality of its great gardens and parks, Soutine found the ideal match for his turbulent brushwork in the craggy Pyrenean landscape. In most of the Céret landscapes, figures when there are any are reduced to flicks of paint in the overarching rhythms of the composition but here they are as forcefully defined as the trees and houses.  Referring to the Paysage à Céret, 1920 - 21, in the Tate Gallery, London, David Sylvester commented that the exercise of looking at it, “Has nothing to do with the experience of gazing at a landscape.. Whether it is noon or dusk, whether it is raining or the wind is blowing, is of no concern. Nor is it really a matter of importance what things the shapes stand for – that this is a hill or a house or a tree. We acknowledge that it is, but we get no feeling- such as we do before a Matisse, a Bonnard, a Picasso- that this particular transformation of an object is making us see this kind of object in a new way.  We do not read this landscape in terms of objects and relations between objects. Our awareness cuts through objects. It responds to rhythms, to an interplay of forces” (David Sylvester, "The Mysteries of Nature within the Mysteries of Paint,"  Chaim Soutine, London, 1981, pp. 38-39).

 

 

Fig. 1, Pablo Picasso, Paysage de Céret,  1911, oil on canvas, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

 

Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale

|
New York