15
15

PROPERTY FORMERLY FROM THE SANDBLOM COLLECTION

Aristide Maillol
FEMME ACCROUPIE
Estimate
350,000450,000
LOT SOLD. 744,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
15

PROPERTY FORMERLY FROM THE SANDBLOM COLLECTION

Aristide Maillol
FEMME ACCROUPIE
Estimate
350,000450,000
LOT SOLD. 744,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Evening

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New York

Aristide Maillol
1861-1944
FEMME ACCROUPIE
Marble
Height: 9 1/4 in.
23.5 cm
Executed in 1937.  This work is unique.
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The authenticity of this work has kindly been confirmed by Dina Vierny.

Provenance

Grace and Philip Sandblom, Stockholm (acquired from the artist in 1937)

 

Exhibited

Paris, Petit Palais, Les Maîtres de l'Art Indépendants, 1937, no. 55

Stockholm, Föreningen för Nudita Konst, Grace och Philip Sandbloms Samling, 1945, no. 58

Copenhagen, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Grace og Philip Sandbloms Samling, 1959, no. 31

Lunds, Konsthall, Samling S, 1969, no. 35

Aarhus, Kunstmuseum, Samling S, 1969, no. 35

Göteborgs Konstmuseum, Fran Delacroix till de Staël, Grace och Philip Sandbloms Samling, 1964, no. 42

Stockholm, Nationalmuseum, The Grace and Philip Sandblom Collection, 1981

Literature

Ragnar B. Hoppe, Neoimpressionismens mästere, Konstrevy, 1937, illustrated p. 153 

Catalogue Note

The model for the present work was Dina Vierny, whom the artist first met in 1937. A beautiful young woman of Russian origin, Vierny bore a striking resemblance to some of the artist's voluptuous nudes from the 1900s. Vierny's introduction to Maillol at the end of the 1930s brought about a renewal of his art and provided him with the inspiration to create monumental sculptures in his final years. Considering Vierny the ideal of feminine beauty, Maillol would make her his principle model from thence forward, and the present work is one of the first sculptures for which she posed.

Speaking of her first experiences with the artist, Vierny recalled the following of Maillol's works of this time: "I began posing for large monumental drawings and for the carving of Nymphs...Next came The Mountain, for which he returned to projects he had had at the beginning of his life, but with a certain change in the conceptions that determined his work....Maillol started out with the pose of a seated woman which he had imagined as early as 1900. It was a figure to which he often returned in his career, tirelessly seeking to reconstruct the articulation of its volumes. He sculpted several statuettes before moving on to the monumental figure'' (quoted in Bertrand Lorquin, Aristide Maillol, New York, 1995, pp. 137-38).

Fig. 1, Photograph of Philip Sandblom with Maillol in the artist's studio

Impressionist & Modern Art Evening

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New York