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THE PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTOR TOGETHER WITH LOTS 110, 111, 124, 131 AND 146

A pair of gilt-bronze and bronze candelabra, after the model by Jean-François Lorta (1752-1837)

19th century

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165

THE PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTOR TOGETHER WITH LOTS 110, 111, 124, 131 AND 146

A pair of gilt-bronze and bronze candelabra, after the model by Jean-François Lorta (1752-1837)

19th century

JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important French & Continental Furniture

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London

A pair of gilt-bronze and bronze candelabra, after the model by Jean-François Lorta (1752-1837)

19th century

each in the form of a standing neo-classical female figure in drapery supporting a fluted cornocopia filled with fruits and issuing reeded and spirally twisted leaf cast candlearms centred by a flaming tripod with ram's head handles, supported on the heads of a female sphinx; drilled for electricity, on circular bases,signed  'JEAN FR. LORTA SCULP. 1788'  on square white marble plinths, within an oak leaf and acorn border, on bracket feet; drilled for electricity; together with a modern faux marble wooden plinths


each 141cm. high; 4ft. 7½in. plinths 86cm. high, 36cm. wide, 2ft. 9¾in., 1ft. 2in.
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Catalogue Note

Comparative Literature:
Daniel Alcouffe, Anne Dion-Tenenbaum, Gérard Mabille, Gilt bronzes in the Louvre, Dijon, 2004, p. 181, no. 93 (inv. OA 8172 and 8173). 

This pair of candelabra are based upon the four magnificent candelabra that were acquired by Louis XV's daughters, Mesdames Adélaide and Victoire just before the Revolution, to furnish the Grand Salon of the Château at Bellevue. They were in white marble and gilt-bronze and the bases were signed and dated 1788 by Jean-François Lorta (1752-1837) and are reproduced here in fig. 1. The figures on the Louvre set symbolised the seasons by their hairstyles  and attributes. They remained in Bellevue until the Revolution and then were placed in Empress Josephine's second salon at the Tuileries in 1807. From 1809 to 1830, they were moved into the Galerie de Diane. From 1830, they were split into two pairs and ended up in various locations including Versailles and Fontainebleau finally ending up in the Louvre.

Important French & Continental Furniture

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London