144
144

THE PROPERTY OF A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTOR

A gilt-bronze mounted tulipwood, kingwood, amaranth, stained sycamore, burr walnut and parquetry commode stamped Hache fils à Grenoble

third quarter 18th century

Estimate
25,00040,000
JUMP TO LOT
144

THE PROPERTY OF A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTOR

A gilt-bronze mounted tulipwood, kingwood, amaranth, stained sycamore, burr walnut and parquetry commode stamped Hache fils à Grenoble

third quarter 18th century

Estimate
25,00040,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important French & Continental Furniture

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A gilt-bronze mounted tulipwood, kingwood, amaranth, stained sycamore, burr walnut and parquetry commode stamped Hache fils à Grenoble

third quarter 18th century

of bombé serpentine form, with a moulded Spanish portor marble top, above two long drawers centred by a roundel with laurel leaf swags within strapwork borders on a cube parquetry ground, with similarly inlaid sides, the stiles inlaid with stylised Greek key motif, on cabriole legs, terminating in scrolled feet
82cm high, 111cm. wide, 57.5cm. deep; 2ft, 8¼in., 3ft. 9¾in., 1ft. 10¾in.
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Provenance

By repute the Comte de Paris, Quinta do Anjinho, Sintra and purchased by the present owner’s father from the sale of the Comte de Paris in Sintra in 1951.

For further information on the Provenance see the footnote to lot 221. 

Catalogue Note

Comparative Literature:
Pierre Rouge and François Rouge, Le génie des Hache, Dijon, 2005,  p. 308, no. 157 and p. 311, no. 160. 
Barbara Scott, `Infused with silken flowers,’ Country Life , March 26th 1998, p. 100.

The Hache family was one of the most prolific dynasties of cabinet-makers in the 18th century. Jean-Francois Hache (1730-1796) was the son of Pierre Hache (1703-1776) and both father and son's oeuvre is characterised by the use of distinctive woods such as amaranth, birch, and maple as well as fruitwoods sometimes in bold marquetry cartouches with ebony inlay or ebonised banding with feather-banding veneer used to highly decorative effect. 

In 1756, Jean-Francois Hache spent several months in Paris and probably worked under the royal cabinet-maker Jean-Francois Oeben. The cube parquetry in a central reserve on this commode is very much characteristic of the style of Oeben and can be seen on another commode by Hache, illustrated by Rouge, op. cit., p. 311, fig. 160 (formerly in the collection Nolte, Munster). The mounts are also identical comprised of roundels encircled by a laurel wreath handles and ribbon-tied lockplates. These features together with the reserve in burr walnut the use of the stylised Greek key motif and exotic woods are typical of the period. The serpentine form of this commode with cabriole legs and the restrained neo-classical gilt-bronze mounts and the sinuous lines of the Louis XV époque slowly approaches the more sober outlines and motifs of the neoclassical in a successfully balanced compromise which explains the  persistence of this type of commode in the production of Jean-François Hache towards the end of the 1770s.

From around 1760, Jean-François Hache used his own personal stamp, `Hache fils à Grenoble’. As stated by Barbara Scott, when discussing the Hache dynasty op. cit., p. 100, `They had an exceptional eye for the grain and colour of different woods, contrasting richly figured boxwood with golden panels of tulipwood polished to shine like watered silk. Particular care was taken in staining woods, for which they had a secret recipe. Their celebrated light green was obtained from an infusion of chervil and parsley.’

 

 

 

Important French & Continental Furniture

|
London