375
375
A pair of carved walnut refectory tables

last quarter 19th century, in the French renaissance manner

Estimate
40,00060,000
JUMP TO LOT
375
A pair of carved walnut refectory tables

last quarter 19th century, in the French renaissance manner

Estimate
40,00060,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important English Furniture

|
London

A pair of carved walnut refectory tables

last quarter 19th century, in the French renaissance manner

the broad rectangular tops with deep moulded edges, the twin parallel stretchers with a central square pillar with moulded collar supporting the top, the end supports each with a pair of conforming square pillars divided by a central turned spindle beneath an arch with fan spandrels with carved strapwork and scrolling ornament, on a pair of platform bases with similarly decorated scroll feet


78cm. high, 308cm. long, 123cm. wide; 2ft. 6¾in., 10ft. 1½in., 4ft. ½in.
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Literature

Comparative Literature
Jaques Thirion, Le Mobilier du Moyen Age et de la Renaissance en France, 1998, pp. 128-130
Helena Hayward ed., World Furniture, 1969, p. 144, figs. 120-122.

Catalogue Note

This unusually large pair of refectory tables appear to be of an unrecorded pattern, although their quality is suggestive of a leading manufacturer represented at one of the international decorative arts exhibitions held during the latter part of the 19th century.  Their impressive scale and advanced design indicate they originally formed part of an important commission for a wealthy patron undertaking an interior decorating scheme in the renaissance revival manner.

The form of the present tables draw their inspiration from a group of engravings of tables published by a circle of 16th century French and Flemish designers including Jacques Androuet Du Cerceau (c.1510-1584), Hughes Sambin (1515/20-1600/02) and Hans Vredeman de Vries (1527-1604) some of which are preserved in the Biblioteque national de France. These designers were heavily influenced by the work of the Italian mannerists who adopted the architectural style and thin strapwork featured on the offered examples.  Early prototypes of this configuration of table are included in The Frick Collection and the Musée du Louvre (see Thirion op. cit., pp. 130-131) 

Important English Furniture

|
London