339
339
A matched pair of Anglo-Indian ebony benches
Coromandel Coast, 2nd Quarter 19th century
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 12,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
339
A matched pair of Anglo-Indian ebony benches
Coromandel Coast, 2nd Quarter 19th century
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 12,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important English Furniture

|
London

A matched pair of Anglo-Indian ebony benches
Coromandel Coast, 2nd Quarter 19th century
the top-rails carved with scrolling foliage, with caned seats, on twist carved legs
90cm. high, 119cm. wide, 69cm. deep; 2ft. 11½in., 3ft. 11in., 2ft. 3¼in. other 90cm. high, 115.5cm. wide, 64.5cm. deep;
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Catalogue Note

A pair of armchairs dated 1820-25, with strong similarities  to the current lot is illustrated in Amin Jaffer, Furniture from British India and Ceylon, 2001, p.131, fig. 58. which are described as incorporating earlier panels. The similar form to the offered lot tends to support the opinion that the backs and rails are of an earlier date. Jaffer mentions that it was quite common in the early 19th century for pieces of furniture in this style and of this type to be made incorporating earlier elements. The armchairs referred to ante were part of a suite including four ebony sofas sold to George IV by E.H.Baldock in 1828 for £125. Hugh Roberts in For The King`s Pleasure, The Furnishing and Decoration of George IV`s Apartments at Windsor Castle, London, 2001, p. 269, figs.347 and 348 illustrates two carved ebony benches which formed part of this group and describes the frames as being from Sri Lanka, c.1820, the carved panels, Dutch East Indies, circa 1680.

A further related example can be seen illustrated in Jaffer, (op.cit.) p.142 which is believed to have formed part of the collection of the renowned antiquary William Beckford at Fonthill Abbey, Wiltshire and which now forms part of the collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.  This chair is dated 1680-1700 and has a front-rail, the carving on which is almost identical to those of the offered lot. 

A group of very similar armchairs of the same period are illustrated in Stephen Parissien, Regency Style, 1992, p. 201.

Important English Furniture

|
London