318
318
A George III inlaid satinwood cabinet

circa 1790, in the manner of Seddon

Estimate
12,00018,000
LOT SOLD. 28,800 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
318
A George III inlaid satinwood cabinet

circa 1790, in the manner of Seddon

Estimate
12,00018,000
LOT SOLD. 28,800 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important English Furniture

|
London

A George III inlaid satinwood cabinet

circa 1790, in the manner of Seddon

the cornice with tear drop mouldings above two glazed doors with cross banded astragals above three small drawers, the projecting lower part similarly banded with one long drawer above an inset door enclosing a cupboard, flanked by doors with figured mahogany panels with crossbanding on square tapering legs panelled with mahogany
207.5cm. high, 87cm. wide, 47cm. deep; 6ft. 9 3/4 in., 2ft. 10 1/4 in., 1ft. 6 1/2 in.
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Catalogue Note

An almost identical inlaid satinwood bookcase in the manner of Seddons is illustrated in, Geoffrey Wills, Craftsmen and Cabinet-makers of Classic English Furniture, 1974, p.124, fig. 111.

The firm of Seddon, which was possibly the largest manufacturer of furniture in the last quarter of the 18th century, was founded by George Seddon (c.1727-1801) and by 1753 he had purchased a two acre site in Aldersgate Street which included London House, the former residence of the Bishop of London, remaining at his address until 1826. These premises were visited by Miss Sophie Von Roche in 1786, her diary containing a fascinating and detailed account of Seddon's workshop in which recorded the staff numbering 400 employees. The partnership of Seddon, Sons and Shackleton was formed in 1790 when Thomas Shackleton, a cabinet-maker with premises at 115 Long Acre, married Mary, the eldest daughter of George Seddon. On George's retirement in 1798 the partnership was dissolved, and his two sons assumed control of the business.

Important English Furniture

|
London