213
213
A set of five carved ivory plaques depicting mythological figures in gilt metal frames

Late 18th century, attributed to Andrea Pozzi

Estimate
5,0008,000
LOT SOLD. 26,400 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
213
A set of five carved ivory plaques depicting mythological figures in gilt metal frames

Late 18th century, attributed to Andrea Pozzi

Estimate
5,0008,000
LOT SOLD. 26,400 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important English Furniture

|
London

A set of five carved ivory plaques depicting mythological figures in gilt metal frames

Late 18th century, attributed to Andrea Pozzi

depicting the Farnese Hercules, the Belvedere Antinous, The Three Graces, Venus Callipygia, and Apollo.
12cm.; 4¾in.
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Catalogue Note

Comparative Literature:
Christian Theuerkauff, Nachmittelalterliche Elfenbeine, Berlin, 1986, p. 245

Margarita M. Estella Marcos, La Escultura Barroca de Marfil en Espana, Madrid 1984, vol i, figs. 45-53,  vol ii. pp. 33-43

Andrea Pozzi (not recorded after 1784) was an ivory sculptor from Rome.  His father Giovanni Battista (1670-1752) was also a sculptor, and a powerful influence on his style. His brother Roque was an engraver whose compositions after the antique were sometimes reproduced in ivory by Andrea.  Andrea's career is first noted in 1764, when he is recorded as the head of the workshop and 'professor of ivory works of art' at the Buen Retiro palace in Madrid, under King Carlos III.  Although he produced at least two pieces depicting figures in period costume (A signed medallion, produced in Rome and dated 1755, now at the Baltimore Museum of Art, and a portrait of the Stuart princes at Brodick Castle, Isle of Arran), he was known primarily as a copier of antique compositions, both in relief and in sculpture. From at least the mid 1750s he was producing works of art in ivory for Grand Tourists in Rome and Naples.  Examples of his work can be found in the Escorial,  and in the Baltimore and Dresden museums. 

Important English Furniture

|
London