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PROPERTY OF A LADY

James Drummond R.S.A.
1816-1877
QUEEN MARY'S LAST LOOK AT SCOTLAND
Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 114,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
1007

PROPERTY OF A LADY

James Drummond R.S.A.
1816-1877
QUEEN MARY'S LAST LOOK AT SCOTLAND
Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 114,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Gleneagles Pictures

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London

James Drummond R.S.A.
1816-1877
1816-1877
QUEEN MARY'S LAST LOOK AT SCOTLAND
signed and inscribed with the title and the artist's address on an old label on the reverse: Queen Mary's Last Look at/ Scotland./ James Drummond/ 30 Hamilton Place/ Edinburgh
oil on panel
79 by 121 cm., 31 by 47 ½ in.
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Exhibited

Royal Academy, 1865, lot 606

Literature

Art Journal, 1865, p. 112

Catalogue Note

Arthur Drummond was born in John Knox's House in Edinburgh on 13th August 1816, the son of an Edinburgh merchant. Whilst studying at the Trustees Academy under David Allan, Drummond became steeped in the archaeology and history of Scotland and became fascinated with subjects which permeated his whole future oeuvre. He educated himself in Scottish heraldry, historic costume and arms which gave his paintings of events from Scottish history and folk-lore a convincing accuracy of detail. He became one of the most successful painters of historical subjects in Scotland and his paintings can be found in many public art galleries in Scotland and England.

The critic for Art Journal in 1865 favourably assessed Drummond's painting when it was exhibited in London; 'The high merits of this artist as a historical painter are undisputed, and even if they were, his principal works in this exhibition would certainly place him in the front ranks of the Scottish school. The subject is one which the powers of any artist would be severely tested; it is the escape from Scotland of Queen Mary, with seven of her followers, in a small fishing-boat, after the battle of Langside. It is called 'Queen Mary's Last Look at Scotland,' and there is an intensity of feeling in that last look which evidently overcomes all fear of the heavily rolling sea in a dangerously crowded boat; a thousand mournful thoughts seem to be rising as the kingdom which has just slipped from her grasp is fast fading from her sight. The subject was worthy the pencil of a good artist, and it has received its deserts from the pencil of Mr. Drummond. The grouping of the figures in the boat is most masterly, and the mixture of the gaily apparelled courtiers, with the roughly-clad fishermen, has afforded him an opportunity of showing his excellent taste for colour; while his treatment of the surrounding sea is bold, vigorous, and truthful.' (Art Journal, 1865, p. 112)

Gleneagles Pictures

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London