71
71
Lovecraft, H.P.
Estimate
7,00010,000
LOT SOLD. 9,600 USD
JUMP TO LOT
71
Lovecraft, H.P.
Estimate
7,00010,000
LOT SOLD. 9,600 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Books and Manuscripts Including A Private Collection of Historical Hawaiiana

|
New York

Lovecraft, H.P.
Five autograph letters signed and thirty-five autograph picture (all but one) postcards signed, consisting of: 4 autograph letters signed, 29 autograph picture postcards signed, and 1 autograph postcard signed to Walter J. Coates (amateur journalist in North Montpelier, Vt., who issued the little magazine Driftwoods); 1 autograph letter signed and 3 autograph picture postcards signed to Paul J. Campbell (amateur journalist and editor); and 2 autograph picture postcards signed to Anthony Pryor in Ozone Park, N.Y. Together 44 pages (ranging in size from 3 1/2 x 5 1/2 in., 88 x 140 mm, to 14 x 8 1/2 in., 370 x 215mm), written mainly from Providence, R. I., but also from Florida, Quebec, Brooklyn, and elsewhere, 1924-1936, mostly signed "HPL" (about 6 signed "H P Lovecraft"); 2 letters to Coates with marginal punch holes affecting several letters.
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Literature

None of the cards or letters are printed in Selected Letters, ed. A. Derleth and D. Wandrei

Catalogue Note

"Hawthorne at his best cannot be said to be seriously challenged today."  In his letters and cards to Coates, Lovecraft describes his travels, discusses issues of Driftwood (he was a contributor), talks a bit of his and Coates's writings, speaks of mutual friends, and writes of literature, publishing, and other authors. Lovecraft's letter and cards to Campbell mainly concern his travels, but he does discuss some mutual friends and he mentions Robert E. Howard ("a weird writer"); his cards to Pryor deal with the recipient's poetry and amateur journalism.

N.d., "Thursday," to Coates: "As to Poe in Providence -- I've made no original discoveries. The incident of the Ulalume signature was unearthed by Prof. Koopman, Librarian of Brown Univ., while Poe's other local manoeuvers are now pretty well incorporated into recent biographies. The only personal touch for me is the amusing dislike of Poe current in my family, & ... [the] surviving memories of his alcoholic proclivities...The mother & aunts of my elder aunt's husband knew Mrs. [Sarah Helen] Whitman quite well -- admiring her in the main, though smiling at her occasional harmless affectations in attire -- such as white shoes out of season..." 4 October 1929: There is no question that Melville is great & that Longfellow is mediocre. I'm not sure about Dickinson...Vast gulfs between 1880 & 1929 are apparent there [England], as here; & thence shows us about how our own race & tradition responds to the intellectual readjustments of the period. It is our job to repudiate the Jewish admixture if we can, & to follow the curve of purely Anglo-Saxon thought without becoming arbitrarily reactionary or ostrich-headed. Another thing -- Hawthorne at his best cannot be said to be seriously challenged today. P.P.S. If I were you, I'd discriminate more about changing values. Milton is not seriously challenged today, &  Wilkie Collins never was accepted as a major figure. Moreover, Fielding & Smollett have always been in the front rank."

25 January 1932: "Glad you found some of the Fungi [the sonnet sequence "Fungi from Yuggoth"] worth using. 'Recognition' & 'The Canal'  represent recurrent dream-types which I have encountered since earliest youth. Yes -- I wish I could include the whole lot in a booklet some time. There are two or three more around here somewhere, which I never had the energy to type." 14 February [1936]: "Visited [Frank Belknap] Long in N.Y. around New Year's, & saw all the gang. [Samuel] Loveman's new book of poems was out...Have you seen the new book of Long's poems -- The Goblin Town -- which [Robert H.] Barlow & I crudely printed last summer when I was in [Florida]?"  10 October n.y.: "Thanks for Driftwood...The present issue is splendid...I was particularly interested in your account of Ethan Allen's philosophic beliefs. Our friend Woodburn Harris is much perturbed by what he considers the attempt of modern Vermonters to conceal the fact that Allen was Deist & that he wrote the 'Oracle'..."

Fine Books and Manuscripts Including A Private Collection of Historical Hawaiiana

|
New York