214
214
Dana, Alice
Estimate
8001,200
LOT SOLD. 720 USD
JUMP TO LOT
214
Dana, Alice
Estimate
8001,200
LOT SOLD. 720 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Books and Manuscripts Including A Private Collection of Historical Hawaiiana

|
New York

Dana, Alice

Autograph letter, signed “Alice.” To her sister Anna H. Dana and other relatives in Portland Maine. Honolulu: 30 March 1884

Small folio, 3 ½ pages, on stationery of the “Hawaiian Hotel” with an engraved vignette showing the establishment, two addressed envelopes of which one is stamped and the other with stamp torn off.


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Catalogue Note

Miss Dana reports on the Quarterly Meeting of the Native Sabbath Schools: “The Superintendent was son of Mr. Smith [possibly Lowell Smith, 1802-1891], who came here as a missionary over their church 52 years ago. He is still here, has superannuated and after service we were introduced to him and his wife. The site of this church is moved by the American Board and is where the first missionary church was built which was an adobe hut 49 by 99 feet in dimension, with first a thatched roof and afterwards a modern one. ... There was a wonderful revival in 1838, ’39 & ’40 and Mr. Smith said he had administered communion to 1200 communicants in their church at a time. ... This morning, of course, most of the exercises were in Hawaiian.... The prettiest sight of all was a little class of boys and one girl from six to twelve years of age. The teacher walked on the platform with them and told them where to stand. Then the little girl drops down on her knees very reverently and repeats what we suppose is the Lord’s Prayer. The natives always gesticulate and act all they say. Then the tiny fellow six years old, the smallest of the whole class, leads the class, questioning them individually, ending by making a prayer.... For music they had a band of 25 pieces, comprised of boys from the Industrial School from 7 to 15 years old.... They had white uniforms, blue caps, and most of them were bare-footed. Almost every Islander is naturally very fond of music and learns to sing and play readily. So the band was excellent and many of the voices were remarkably sweet. On the whole I think the singing was finer than any I have heard at New England Sunday School concerts.”

Fine Books and Manuscripts Including A Private Collection of Historical Hawaiiana

|
New York