200
200
Hawaiian Reciprocity Treaty and Annexation
Estimate
8001,200
LOT SOLD. 1,800 USD
JUMP TO LOT
200
Hawaiian Reciprocity Treaty and Annexation
Estimate
8001,200
LOT SOLD. 1,800 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Books and Manuscripts Including A Private Collection of Historical Hawaiiana

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New York

Hawaiian Reciprocity Treaty and Annexation

A good group of 8 pamphlets (including 1 duplicate) offering the arguments for the Reciprocity Treaty and Annexation of the Hawaiian Territory, as listed below. Washington, Boston, Honolulu: 1876 - 1910

Ward, Elijah. The Hawaiian Treaty – Its importance to our Trade with the “East,” and the Necessity of a Continental Commercial System ... Speech of Hon. Elijah Ward, in the House of Representatives, March 4, 1876. Washington: Congressional Record, 1876. 8vo, blue printed wrappers; dampstained. Not in Forbes. — Reciprocity Treaty. An Argument in Support of the Hawaiian Reciprocity Treaty. [Washington:] Judd & Detweiler, [1882]. 8vo, printed wrappers; small hole in upper cover, some browning. Forbes 4:3480. — Alexander, W[illiam] D[e Witt]. A Brief Account of the Hawaiian Government Survey, its Objects, Methods and Results. Honolulu: Bulletin Steam Print, 1889. 8vo, blue printed wrappers; some fading. Forbes 4:4059. — Thurston, Lorrin Andrews. A Hand-Book on the Annexation of Hawaii. St. Joseph, Michigan: A.B. Morse Company, [1897]. 8vo, maps, printed wrappers, with half slip at p. 57; tear in backstrip, some edge browning. Plus another copy. First edition. Forbes 4:4852 — Boutwell, George Sewall. Hawaiian Annexation, Hon. Geo. S. Boutwell’s Address before the Boot and Shoe Club of Boston December 22, 1897. Boston: J.E. Farwell & Co., 1898. 8vo, printed self wrappers; corners and backstrip torn. Forbes 4:4877. — Hawaiian Commission. Report of the Hawaiian Commission appointed in pursuance of the “Joint Resolution to provide for Annexing the Hawaiian Islands to the United States,” approved July 7, 1898. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1898. 8vo, printed wrappers; upper hinge detached. First edition. Forbes 4:4978. — Depew, Chauncey M. Hawaii – Government and Conditions before and since Annexation to the United States and Present Requirements – Speech of Hon. Chauncey M. Depew of New York in the Senate of the United States February 24, 1910. Washington: [Government Printing Office], 1910. Library boards, discard stamp of Hobart College Library; soiled.


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Catalogue Note

speeches and papers in support of the reciprocity treaty and hawaiian annexation

The 1876 reciprocity treaty between Hawai'i and the United States allowed duty-free sales of Hawai'i sugar and other selected agricultural products in the United States as well as duty-free sales of most U.S. manufactured goods in Hawai'i. Sugar exports from Hawai'i to the United States soared after the treaty's promulgation, rising from 21 million pounds in 1876 to 114 million pounds in 1883 to 224.5 million pounds in 1890.

Elijah Ward (1816-1882), New York congressman, argued for reciprocity in this speech delivered in the House on 4 March 1876. — The anonymous Argument answers objections to the treaty made by East Coast sugar interests and discusses commerce with the Islands, denying that the treaty creates a sugar monopoly. — Lorrin A. Thurston (1858-1931) was owner and editor of the Honolulu Advertiser and one of the leaders of the 1893 revolution. His Handbook is a digest of papers and historic documents arguing for the annexation. — George S. Boutwell (1818-1905), congressman from Massachusetts and at this point counsel for Hawai’i, discusses American interests in the annexation of the Territory but is not convinced that annexation is necessary. He supports the continuation of the reciprocity treaty but notes that the Hawaiians “as a body have never been consulted.” — The Hawaiian Commission of five members began meetings in Honolulu 18 August 1898 receiving petitions and papers. Their report contains much detailed information on the Islands, the inhabitants, the Crown lands, the leper settlement, voting qualifications, labor supply, and the administration of territory. Also included is the bill to provide a government for the Territory (pp. 22-44) and a list of all Hawaiian government lands and property as of 1898.

Fine Books and Manuscripts Including A Private Collection of Historical Hawaiiana

|
New York