20
20
Napoleon I
Estimate
15,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 22,800 USD
JUMP TO LOT
20
Napoleon I
Estimate
15,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 22,800 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Books and Manuscripts Including A Private Collection of Historical Hawaiiana

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New York

Napoleon I
Autograph letter signed ("Napolion di Buonapart"), 3 pages (7 3/4 x 6 1/8 in.; 192 x 156 mm), integral address leaf, In garrison, Valance, Dauphiné, 25 November 1785, to M. Amieillo, protesting that he has kept his family abreast of his movements since taking a commission as artillery lieutenant. Mounted and bound in full red crushed morocco panelled gilt, spine lettered gilt.
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Catalogue Note

The sixteen-year-old newly appointed artillery lieutenant protests to the director of students of the King that he has not been negligent about informing his family of his whereabouts and thanks the director for all the interest he has shown in Napoleon's family. "One could not be more touched than I am by the interest you are kindly taking in us. One could not however be more mortified by the trouble you have occasioned yourself; I cannot understand how my dear relatives could have been concerned about me for a moment. I wrote to them twice before leaving Paris where I sent them an outline of our plan . . . besides, I had received an extraordinary order to rejoin this regiment at Valence, which I have done and I have been here for three weeks, during which time I have written three more times. . . . if I am guilty of the slightest negligence, I should have, it is true, informed you of it. But I thought to myself that Mr. Fesch, whom I believe to be in Corsica would have written to you about it. "

Napoleon also writes that a family friend and benefactor Marbeuf informed him in Paris that his brother Lucciano [Lucien] could not yet be a student at the Aix seminary, that he would have to remain at Brienne. A combination of his father's social ambitions, his mother's extra-marital affair with the Comte de Marbeuf—Corsica's French military governor—and Napoleon's own ability enabled him to enter the military academy at Brienne in 1779 at the age of ten. He moved to the Parisian École Royale Militaire in 1784 and graduated a year later as a second lieutenant in the artillery. The count, still smitten with Letizia, rendered countless favors on behalf of her husband, children, and even her half-brother Fesch, whom Napoleon mentions in the letter.

Napoleon asks the seminary director to return to him the alarming letters sent by his relatives. He also mentions that he is planning a feast for himself next September and hoped to personally meet with the director at that time.  Napoleon did take a leave of absence in September 1786.

Fine Books and Manuscripts Including A Private Collection of Historical Hawaiiana

|
New York