191
191
Jarves, James Jackson
Estimate
8001,200
LOT SOLD. 6,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
191
Jarves, James Jackson
Estimate
8001,200
LOT SOLD. 6,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Books and Manuscripts Including A Private Collection of Historical Hawaiiana

|
New York

Jarves, James Jackson

History of the Hawaiian Islands: Embracing Their Antiquities, Mythology, Legends ... With Their Civil, Religious and Political History, from the Earliest Traditionary Period to the Year 1846. Honolulu: Henry M. Whitney, 1872

In 8s (9 1/4 x 5 3/4 in.; 235 x 146 mm). Mounted photographic frontispiece full-length portrait of King Kamehameha, 20 wood-engraved illustrations (including 2 full-page, being map of the Hawaiian Islands and a view of Kilauea volcano, together with an appendix by Henry M. Whitney, 18 pages of advertisements by local merchants bound in at the end; long tear affecting text on p. 11 crudely repaired with cellophane tape. Publisher's half black roan over brown pebbled cloth; extremities worn.


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Provenance

D. Banks McKenzie (ownership inscription on front free endpaper) 

Literature

Forbes, Hawaiian National Bibliography 2957

Catalogue Note

The fourth, revised edition of Jarves' s History, which was first published in Boston and London in 1843. This is the second edition to be published in Hawaii, and is notable for its early use of an albumen photograph of Kamehameha V for the frontispiece.  Born in Boston, Jarves settled in Hawaii in 1837. Although he had many occupations, he is principally remembered as a writer and editor. He founded the weekly Polynesian in 1840 which became the official organ of the Hawaiian government in 1844, and he wrote the first novel with a Hawaiian background.

The appendix, by the pioneer commercial printer and publisher Henry Martyn Whitney, provides a compilation of statistics on population (including a tabulation of the 1866 census), agriculture, and commerce. Much historical information presented, including a sketch of Hawaiian volcanoes, derives from reports first published in his weekly newspaper, the Pacific Commercial Advertiser (forerunner of the current Honolulu Advertiser) and from Jarves's Scenes and Scenery (Boston, 1843). Having learned the printing trade at Harper & Brothers in New York, Whitney also published works for the missions, established the first post office in Hawaii and printed its stamps (1850), created the weekly Hawaiian language newspaper Ka Nupepa Kuoloa (1860–1927); ran the Hawaiian Gazette, and edited the Planters' Monthly from 1886 to 1903. Whitney also served on the royal privy council from 1873 to 1891.

Fine Books and Manuscripts Including A Private Collection of Historical Hawaiiana

|
New York