14
14
Jung, Carl G.
Estimate
1,5002,500
LOT SOLD. 3,300 USD
JUMP TO LOT
14
Jung, Carl G.
Estimate
1,5002,500
LOT SOLD. 3,300 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Books and Manuscripts Including A Private Collection of Historical Hawaiiana

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New York

Jung, Carl G.
Typed letter signed ("C.G. Jung"), 4 pages (11 1/2 x 8 1/4 in.; 292 x 210 mm) on his personal stationery, Zurich, 9 February 1939, to W. Y. Evans-Wentz, with several autograph annotations and comments, covering a wide variety of topics from consciousness to the unconscious, metaphysics, agnosticism, etc. ; scattered staining on the bottom margin of the last page. Folding case, green morocco spine lettered gilt.
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Catalogue Note

An intensely intellectual letter on consciousness to W. Y. Evans-Wentz, author of The Tibetan Book of the Great Liberation for which Jung was to write an introduction.  Jung seems more preoccupied with critiquing a work by a Mr. Sturdy that involves paranormal effects. "The so-called 'psychic reactions of lower organisms are very well-known to me, but there is no proof at all that these psychic reactions are conscious to an ego, they can be merely psychic. Psyche is . . . by no means identical with consciousness, since we know that there are plenty of reactions in man of which he is completely unconscious."

Jung also scoffs at Sturdy's notion of being able to control one's dreams. "Can he say 'To-day I'm going to dream such and such a dream'? I have never heard of such a thing. That you can learn to remember your dreams has nothing to do with 'to control one's dreams.' . . . In as much as you can remember your dreams at all, it is evident that your consciousness continues at least in a dim way throught the sleep, otherwise you couldn't dream and you couldn't remember the dream."

Jung insists that consciousness and the void are opposed to one another. " . . . [W]hen the subject enters Sunyata and becomes identical with it, then the subject itself is Sunyata, namely Void. And when the Void is really void, then there is not even a cognizing subject in it. The subject has vanished and there cannot be a consciousness of this fact, because there is nothing left any more. There also can be no memory of it, because there has been nothing. . . . To experience of Sunyata—and inasmuch as one assumes that the experiencing Ego completely dissolved in the Void—is therefore an impossible experience by definition . . . "

"Agnosticism is my duty as a scientist." I don't compete with confessions of religious creeds. I never claimed to be a metaphysician and I do not sympathize with the preaching of more metaphysical convictions. We have too many of them already and too few that are really believed." He can therefore accept the fact that certain people are convinced of the existence of a personal god, belief in the virgin birth, immaculate conception, and so forth but he cannot suggest that these are absolute truths insofar as he has no evidence for them.

Fine Books and Manuscripts Including A Private Collection of Historical Hawaiiana

|
New York