137
137
(Cook, Captain James)
Estimate
8001,200
LOT SOLD. 4,200 USD
JUMP TO LOT
137
(Cook, Captain James)
Estimate
8001,200
LOT SOLD. 4,200 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Books and Manuscripts Including A Private Collection of Historical Hawaiiana

|
New York

(Cook, Captain James)
Pen-and-ink drawing of the original monument to Captain Cook at Kealakekua Bay, (Hawaii, ca. 1837), (7  1/4  x 5  1/8  in.; 84 x 130 mm); minor light staining, by Henry Bruce (see preceding lot).
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Catalogue Note

A fine drawing of the original monument marking the spot where Captain Cook died.  When Cook arrived at Kealakekua Bay in 1779, he was given a rapturous greeting by the inhabitants of the Big Island.  After a brief stay in which Cook filled his ships with food and water, he sailed away, but sprung a mast not far out.  He returned to Kealakekua to repair his ship and take on more supplies.  This proved to be a fatal error as the natives had already supplied Cook with a good portion of their harvest and needed the rest for themselves.  The season of Ku, a war god, had also begun.  An altercation ensued on the shoreline near the village of Ka'awaloa.  Among the warriors who struck down Cook was Kamehameha, a future ruler of Hawai'i. 

The original monument was simply the stump of a palm tree.  In 1837, Captain Henry Bruce arrived at the spot in HMS Imogene.  Two years later a sheet of copper was affixed to the top of the stump.  The inscription on the copper reads, "Near this spot/ Fell/ Captain James Cook R.N./ the/ Renowned circumnavigator/ who /Discovered the islands/ AD 1770/ HMS Imogene/ Oct 17 1837"  According to the caption on the present drawing, "At the stump of this tree Captn Cook died  … This sheet of copper and cap put on by Sparrow Hawk Sept 13/39, in order to preserve the monument to the memory of Cook."  Today a stone monument stands on the site.  

Fine Books and Manuscripts Including A Private Collection of Historical Hawaiiana

|
New York