257
257
Nobuho Nagasawa
NUKE CUISINE: THE DAZE AFTER
Estimate
20,00030,000
JUMP TO LOT
257
Nobuho Nagasawa
NUKE CUISINE: THE DAZE AFTER
Estimate
20,00030,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Contemporary Asian Art

|
New York

Nobuho Nagasawa
NUKE CUISINE: THE DAZE AFTER
signed and dated 1992
aluminum cans and printed paper, in an acrylic display case
each: 7 1/8 by 4 1/4 by 4 1/4 in. 18 by 10.8 by 10.8 cm. overall: 36 1/4 by 21 1/4 by 4 1/4 in. 92 by 54 by 10.8 cm.
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Accompanied with an artist's certificate.

Exhibited

Los Angeles, Daniel Saxton Gallery, The Atomic Cowboy: The Daze After, January - February 1992
New York, Esso Gallery, Atomica: Making the Invisible Visible, June - July, 2005

Literature

Kristine McKenna, "The Real Death Valley," Los Angeles Times, January 19, 1992
Joan Crowder, "Good to the last Drop," Scene, March 19, 1993
Kerry Blankenship, "Art for our sake," The Independent, March 11, 1993 
Midori Yoshimoto, "How to interact with the Forbidden Art?" The Nishi - Nihon Shimbun, November 10, 2005, illustrated
Holland Cotter, "Fanciful to Figurative to Wryly Inscrutable," The New York Times, illustrated in color

Catalogue Note

Nobuho Nagasawa was born in Tokyo and received her M.F.A from Hochschule der Kunst, Berlin, in 1985.  An award-winning interdisciplinary artist investigating cultural history and memory, politics, the environment and architecture, Nagasawa is particularly known for her work in the field of site-specific installation and public art.

Created for the solo exhibition "The Atomic Cowboy: The Daze After," Nuke Cuisine takes as its subject the American military's testing of eleven atomic bombs in 1953 on the Yucca Flats in Nevada, the fallout from which allegedly reached the film set of Howard Hughes' The Conqueror, starring John Wayne and Susan Hayward, in Snow Canyon, Utah.  There were allegations at the time that many cast members and extras were affected, and subsequently died or fell ill.  With obvious reference to her homeland, Nagasawa critques the American military-industrial complex that would rise to power in the post-war era of consumerism that would find its ultimate artistic expression in Andy Warhol's Soup Cans of the early 60s.

Contemporary Asian Art

|
New York