caroline-banner.jpg
Chinese Works of Art

Specialist Picks: Caroline Schulten’s Arts D’Asie Highlights

Version française en fin de page.

 

On 22 June Sotheby’s Paris will present this year’s spring Arts d’Asie sale with rare treasures from French and European private collections, focusing on a group of magnificent 17th and 18th century Chinese jades from the collection of Mr and Mrs Djahanguir Riahi. We chatted to Dr. Caroline Schulten, Head of the Chinese Works of Art Department at Sotheby’s Paris, about the upcoming sale and her favourite pieces.

What was in your mind when you started planning for this sale?

When I go sourcing property for a sale, I always look for unusual objects, good quality, and interesting provenance, elements which can guarantee the overall standard of the pieces in our sale and almost always lead to successful results.

What are the highlights of this season’s Arts d’Asie sale?
Definitely the group of gorgeous jades from the collection of Monsieur and Mme Djahanguir Riahi. Anyone who collects or loves 17th and 18th century Chinese jades should not miss these rare pieces that have not been seen on the market since they were acquired in the late 1960s.

Any particular pieces from this collection that you want to talk about in more detail?

The first piece is a wonderful 18th century spinach-green jade table screen, formerly in the collection of Robert C. Bruce and exhibited in the 1935 International Exhibition of Chinese Art in London. It is skillfully carved with the well-known subject of the encounter between the philosopher Laozi and Yin Xi, Guardian of the Pass and Highest Perfected, which resulted in the very first written manuscript of the principle Taoist text, the Daode jing.

caroline-blog-inline-2.jpg
AN IMPORTANT SPINACH-GREEN JADE TABLE SCREEN SUPERBLY CARVED WITH LAOZI ENCOUNTERING YIN XI , GUARDIAN OF THE PASS, QING DYNASTY, QIANLONG PERIOD. ESTIMATE  €150,000-250,000

The second piece is an exquisite 18th century spinach-green jade brushpot (below) finely carved with ‘The Five Old Men of Suiyang’, commemorating the retirement and friendship of five respected octogenarians in Suiyang (present-day Henan province). Each of them is portrayed in a relaxed manner enjoying themselves in different activities. The deep relief carving with multiple layers gives a strong sense of space and three-dimensionality, which draws the viewer in and brings the scene to life.

caroline-blog-inline-1-new.jpg
A MAGNIFICENT LARGE SPINACH-GREEN JADE BRUSHPOT SKILFULLY CARVED WITH 'THE FIVE OLD MEN OF SUIYANG' , QING DYNASTY, KANGXI TO QIANLONG PERIOD. ESTIMATE €300,000-500,000

Can you tell us more about Monsieur and Mme Djahanguir Riahi? How did they form their collection?

Monsieur and Mme Djahanguir Riahi are known as world-renowned collectors of French furniture and decorative arts. They began collecting Chinese jades in the late 1960s. With a keen eye for quality and rarity, they were very sure of what they liked and always looked for jades with an illustrious past and a story to tell. Most of the pieces were bought at auctions, and at that time often achieved the highest prices among other objects of the same kind. It is quite likely that their deep attachment for their jades, made them keep the pieces for almost 50 years until today.

Why did they collect 17th and 18th century Chinese jades?

At the time when Monsieur and Madame Riahi started collecting Chinese jades in the 1960s, Chinese jades, enamels and porcelains could be found with lavish gilt-bronze mounts added in Europe in the 18th century. These pieces which also featured in their collection, might have directed their attention to Chinese art in general. There were also many 17th and 18th century jades of very good quality and provenance available on the market at that time, which made them aware of this specific category of Chinese art and which inspired them to build a nice collection of 17th and 18th the century Chinese jades. The jades also fitted well into their important collection of 18th century French furniture and works of art as well as the overall decoration of their apartment. They would sometimes move the pieces around from room to room, exploring different visual effects and aesthetic possibilities. Most importantly, there must have been something specific they loved about these jades – be it their natural beauty, their exquisite craftsmanship or their incredible provenances – that made them keep this group for such a long period of time, as Monsieur Riahi explained in 1987:  “Ever since I started in the art field over thirty years ago, I have been attracted by 17th and 18th century jades, dating from the reigns of K’ang Hsi and Kien Long.”

What is your favorite piece in the sale?

I love the ‘Hetian Peach and Crane’ ruyi sceptre (above). Inscribed with a poem by the Qianlong emperor and dedicated to the Empress Dowager Chongqing on the occasion of her 80th birthday in 1773, this exceptional piece is a personal gift from the Qianlong to his much-revered mother. In his poem, the emperor referred to auspicious motifs on the ruyi sceptre, wishing his mother longevity and immortality. The sceptre is a rare display of the emotions of one of the greatest emperors in the Chinese history, who celebrated his mother's 80th birth with lavish gifts including this magnificent jade sceptre and a momentous series of celebrations known as the ‘Vast Longevity’ festival'. For me, this sceptre brings to life and makes tangible an important moment in Chinese history.

caroline-slide-3.jpg
AN IMPORTANT PALE CELADON JADE 'HETIAN PEACH AND CRANE' RUYI SCEPTRE INSCRIBED WITH AN IMPERIAL POEM AND DEDICATED TO THE EMPRESS DOWAGER , DATED TO THE 1ST MONTH OF SPRING OF THE GUISI YEAR OF THE QIANLONG PERIOD (IN ACCORDANCE WITH 1773). ESTIMATE €200,000-300,000

pf1707-caroline-new.jpg
IMAGE OF THE EMPRESS DOWAGER CHONGQING AT THE AGE OF EIGHTY
 THE WORLD REJOICES AS ONE. CELEBRATING IMPERIAL BIRTHDAYS IN THE QING DYNASTY, BEIJING, 2015, CAT. NO. © PALACE MUSEUM, BEIJING

Any recommendations in categories other than jades?

We have a very rare Ming dynasty gilt-bronze and cloisonné enamel vase (above) dated to the later part of the 16th century. This unusual shape is believed to have been derived from Tibetan Buddinst ritual vessels and the earliest recorded example of this form can be traced back to the 15th century.

caroline-blog-4.jpg
A RARE GILT-BRONZE AND CLOISONNÉ ENAMEL VASE , MING DYNASTY, LATE 16TH CENTURY. ESTIMATE €30,000-50,000

There is also an extremely rare carved cinnabar lacquer ‘spirit tablet’ box and cover (above) that I really want to highlight. The carving on the cover is incredibly fine and detailed, presenting a scene from the life of Buddha Shakyamuni preaching to his disciples, a subject that is rarely seen on three-dimensional objects. Since the sides are decorated with 5-clawed dragons and two other examples of identical carvings are inscribed with Emperor Qianlong’s name, we may assume that this too might have been dedicated to Qianlong or a high-ranking member of the imperial family.

caroline-blog-inline-5.jpg
A VERY RARE SUPERBLY CARVED CINNABAR LACQUER 'SOUL TABLET' BOX AND COVER , QING DYNASTY, QIANLONG PERIOD. ESTIMATE €15,000-25,000

Arts D’Asie | Paris | 22 June.


Entretien avec Dr. Caroline Schulten
Vente d’Arts d’Asie le 22 juin à Paris

Le 22 juin, Sotheby’s Paris présente la vente d’Arts d’Asie qui offrira de rares trésors provenant de collections particulières françaises et européennes, comprenant un ensemble de magnifiques jades chinois datant des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles de la collection de M. et Mme. Djahanguir Riahi.

Dr. Caroline Schulten, spécialiste senior et directrice du département des Arts d’Asie de Sotheby’s Paris nous présente brièvement cette vente à venir et partage avec nous ses objets favoris.

Q: A quoi pensez-vous lorsque vous commencez à préparer la vente ?

Lorsque je pars en quête d’objets pour la vente, je recherche toujours des sujets intéressants et originaux, de superbe qualité, avec une bonne provenance. Ces critères cumulés garantissent le bon niveau global de notre vente, ce qui amène toujours à de beaux résultats.

Q: Quels sont les lots phares de cette saison en Arts d’Asie ?

Sans aucun doute l’ensemble de onze somptueux jades de la collection de M. et Mme. Djahanguir Riahi. Toute personne qui collectionne ou qui aime les jades chinois des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles  ne devrait pas rater ces rares trésors qui n’ont pas été vus sur le marché depuis leur acquisition à la fin des années 1960.

Q: Avez-vous des objets en particulier dont vous souhaiteriez nous parler dans plus de détails ?

Oui. Le premier est un extraordinaire écran de table en jade vert épinard datant du XVIIIe siècle (Lot 6), ayant appartenu à la collection de Robert C. Bruce, et exposé en 1935 à la International Exhibition of Chinese Art à Londres. Il est habilement sculpté de la célèbre scène historique de la rencontre entre le philosophe Laozi et Yin Xi, le gardien de la Porte du Tibet, qui donna naissance au tout premier manuscrit du principal texte taoïste Daode jing.

Le second objet est un ravissant pot à pinceaux en jade vert épinard du XVIII siècle (Lot 9) finement sculpté des « Cinq Vieillards de Suiyang », célébrant la retraite et l’amitié de cinq octogénaires de la province de Suiyang (actuelle province du Henan). Chacun d’entre eux est figuré s’adonnant avec décontraction aux joies de l’oisiveté. Le profond relief sculpté de plusieurs couches différentes permet de saisir l’espace et la tridimensionnalité, donnant ainsi vie à la scène et invitant le spectateur à s’y immerger.

Q: Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus sur la collection de M. et Mme. Djahanguir Riahi ? Comment ont-ils formé leur collection ?

M. et Mme. Djahanguir Riahi sont des collectionneurs mondialement connus de mobilier et d’arts décoratifs français. Ils ont commencé à collectionner les jades chinois à la fin des années 1960. Avec un œil aiguisé en quête de qualité et de rareté, ils avaient un goût sûr et recherchaient des jades avec un passé illustre et une histoire. La plupart des objets furent achetés en ventes publiques et obtinrent déjà à ce moment-là des résultats très élevés pour des objets de ce genre. Peut-être est-ce pour l’appréciation profonde qu’ils avaient pour ces objets qu’ils les gardèrent plus de 50 ans, jusqu’à nos jours.

Q: Pourquoi ont-ils collectionné des jades chinois des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles?

Au moment où ils commencèrent à collectionner, il était courant de trouver dans les collections particulières d’arts décoratifs européens des porcelaines chinoises du XVIIIe siècle montées en bronze doré, ce qui aurait pu éveiller leur intérêt pour les arts chinois plus généralement. A l’époque, il y avait beaucoup de jades datant des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles de très bonne qualité sur le marché, ce qui leur a permis de se sensibiliser à ce type d’art chinois, autre que la porcelaine, qui avait le potentiel de former une belle collection. Aussi, les jades se fondaient parfaitement avec leur mobilier et décoration intérieure. Ils bougeaient souvent les pièces d’une pièce à l’autre, essayant différents effets visuels et esthétiques. Plus que tout, il existe forcément des raisons qui expliquent leur amour pour ces jades – que ce soit leur beauté naturelle ou la finesse de leur travail – pour qu’ils les chérissent aussi longtemps. Monsieur Riahi expliquait en 1987 : « Depuis que je suis entré dans le monde de l’art il y a plus de trente ans, j’ai été attiré par les jades des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles, datant des ères K’ang Hsi et Kien Long ».

Q: Quel est votre objet préféré de la vente?

J’aime beaucoup le sceptre ruyi en jade céladon pâle intitulé « Pêche et Grue du Hetian. Inscrite d’un poème de l’Empereur Qianlong et dédicacée à l’Impératrice Douairière Chongqing pour son 80e anniversaire en 1773, cette pièce exceptionnelle crée un lien direct entre Qianlong et sa mère. Dans le poème, l’Empereur fait référence aux motifs auspicieux qui ornent le sceptre ruyi, souhaitant à sa mère longévité et immortalité. Ainsi, nous pouvons presque ressentir l’intime émotion d’un des plus grands Empereurs de l’Histoire de Chine, comme si nous étions les témoins privilégiés des festivités de la « Vaste Longévité » au cœur de la Cité Interdite.

Q: D’autres recommandations dans d’autres domaines que les jades?

Nous avons un très rare vase en bronze doré et émaux cloisonnés datant de la fin du XVIe siècle, dynastie Ming. Sa forme inhabituelle est sûrement dérivée des vases rituels bouddhistes du Tibet, et les premières traces des vases de cette forme remontent au XVe siècle.

Il y a également une rare boîte couverte en laque rouge sculptée que je souhaiterais vraiment souligner. Le décor sur le couvercle est incroyablement finement sculpté et détaillé, et présente une scène de la vie du Bouddha Shakyamuni prêchant devant ses disciples, un sujet rarement représenté sur les objets tridimensionnels. Les côtés sont agrémentés de dragons à cinq griffes, et deux autres exemples au décor identique portent une marque de règne Qianlong. Ainsi, pouvons-nous supposer que cet objet aussi ait pu être dédié à l’Empereur Qianlong ou à un membre de haut rang de la famille impériale.

 

We use our own and third party cookies to enable you to navigate around our Site, use its features and engage on social media, and to allow us to perform analytics, remember your preferences, provide services that you have requested and produce content and advertisements tailored to your interests, both on our Site as well as others. For more information, or to learn how to change your cookie or marketing preferences, please see our updated Privacy Policy & Cookie Policy.

By continuing to use our Site, you consent to our use of cookies and to the practices described in our updated Privacy Policy.

Close