In Bordeaux again this week, I was reminded of just how overlooked the dry white wines of the region are. These Sauvignon Blanc-Semillon blends at their best are among the great whites of the world, combining real depth of flavor, aromatic complexity and an irresistible verve. These are wines that make you stand up and take notice.

Although the white wine homeland in Bordeaux is the Graves region south of the city, many Medoc producers are now discovering that their fine gravel soils – such perfect territory for Cabernet Sauvignon – is also good for its parent grape, Sauvignon Blanc. The result is that up and down the Left Bank of Bordeaux, these racy, rich white wines are being made both in increasing number and in improving quality.

While oysters and fruits de mer are usual matches, these wines can easily stand up to more robust meats too. They are, after all, among the most fully flavoured of white wines. And finally – don't be afraid to age them. The best will continue to improve for as long as their sibling red wines.


What to Buy

2013 Clos des Lunes, Lune d'Argent ($19.95)

2011 Caillou Blanc de Talbot ($34.95)

2011 Couhins-Lurton Blanc ($39.95)

2013 Carbonnieux Blanc ($39.95)

2013 Blanc de Lynch Bages ($59.95)

2010 Malartic Lagraviere Blanc ($79.95)

2013 Aile d'Argent (Mouton Rothschild) ($79.95)

2010 Domaine de Chevalier Blanc ($109.95)

2011 Smith Haut Lafitte Blanc ($109.95)

2013 Y d'Yquem ($169)

2013 Pavillon Blanc du Ch. Margaux ($215)

2011 Pavillon Blanc du Ch. Margaux ($495)

2007 Laville Haut Brion ($475)