NEW YORK - Although they are recognised for solo careers in fashion and interior design respectively, Reed and Delphine Krakoff are perhaps best known for their collaborations. The husband and wife launched a furniture line a few years ago, and together they have filled their homes with a collection that encompasses American postwar art and furniture by 18th-century craftsmen to the latest creations by Mark Newson and Joris Laarman. Rooms are not merely furnished; they are given personalities. “Our projects are always an amalgam of both of our tastes,” says Delphine. “That process is what creates our visual aesthetic.”


REED & DELPHINE KRAKOFF. PHOTO CREDIT: KRISTINE LARSEN.

Now the couple is bringing their flair for elegant, adventurous interiors mixing to Sotheby’s with Alchemy: Art x Design, a curated exhibition at Sotheby’s New York. Drawn primarily from Sotheby’s upcoming Important Design sale, the diverse objects in “Alchemy” will be arranged in distinct room-like environments throughout the 10th-floor galleries. “We wanted to bring together varied types of art and design from different movements and periods to create a dialogue between seemingly disparate ideas,” says Reed. For example, that means a 1960s monochrome canvas might be shown with a piece of antique marble statuary atop an American midcentury wooden table.


PIETRO CHIESA, AN IMPORTANT AND RARE “BLUE CHIARO ARGENTATO” CABINET, MODEL NO. 0774 A. ESTIMATE $150,000–250,000.

The idea behind such combinations is to show how objects separated by centuries can not only coexist harmoniously but also can compliment one another. Collectors might be surprised, for example, by how a contemporary painting might be enlivened by “the organic geometry of a Tiffany Turtleback hanging lamp,” Reed explains. The process will be an organic one, he notes, if you always buy what you love, and buy the best quality. “The word curate is just another way of referring to personal style,” he adds. “You identify and select the things that you want to surround yourself with.”

 

LEAD IMAGE: GEORGE NAKASHIMA, "MINGUREN I" COFFEE TABLE. ESTIMATE $100,000–150,000.

二十世紀設計藝術

16 December 2015 | New York