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PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, MASSACHUSETTS

Joseph Christian Leyendecker
VOTES FOR WOMEN
前往
17

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, MASSACHUSETTS

Joseph Christian Leyendecker
VOTES FOR WOMEN
前往

拍品詳情

美國藝術

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紐約

Joseph Christian Leyendecker
1874 - 1951
VOTES FOR WOMEN
signed JCLeyendecker (lower left)
oil on canvas
26 1/8 by 19 1/8 inches
(66.4 by 48.6 cm)
Painted in 1911.
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來源

The artist
Estate of the above
Private collection, 1951 (acquired from the above)
By descent to the present owner

出版

The Saturday Evening Post, December 30, 1911, cover illustration (© SEPS licensed by Curtis Licensing, Indianapolis, IN. All rights reserved.)
Michael Schau, J.C. Leyendecker, New York, 1974, p. 176, illustrated
Jan Cohn, Covers of “The Saturday Evening Post:" Seventy Years of Outstanding Illustration from America’s Favorite Magazine, New York, 1995, illustrated p. 60
Laurence S. Cutler and Judy Goffman Cutler, J.C. Leyendecker: American Imagist, New York, 2008, illustrated p. 114

相關資料

Beloved for his series of New Years’ babies that he illustrated for the cover of The Saturday Evening Post, Joseph Christian Leyendecker created the present work in celebration of the women’s suffrage movement of the early twentieth century. Nearly one hundred years ago, on May 21, 1919, the United States House of Representatives passed the 19th amendment, which guaranteed women the right to vote. On August 18, 1920, the amendment passed its final obstacle when Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the amendment, securing votes from three-fourths of the states.

Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, generations of woman suffrage supporters lectured, lobbied, petitioned, and marched to win the right to vote. Few early supporters of the amendment, first introduced in 1878, lived to see the final ratification in 1920. By 1912, nine western states adopted their own woman suffrage legislation, while other states challenged male-only voting laws in the courts. Throughout their campaigns, courageous supporters frequently endured verbal, and sometimes physical, abuse as well as jailing. When New York State adopted woman suffrage legislation in 1917, President Woodrow Wilson changed his position to support the 19th amendment, a decision that significantly shifted the political balance in the suffragettes’ favor. On August 26, 1920, Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby certified the ratification of the amendment, officially granting women the right to vote.

美國藝術

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紐約