2143
2143

PROPERTY OF A NEW YORK COLLECTOR

Abraham Lincoln
AUTOGRAPH ENDORSEMENT SIGNED ("A. LINCOLN”) AS SIXTEENTH PRESIDENT, ON A MANUSCRIPT PETITION TO LINCOLN FROM "MANY CITIZENS OF LOYALTY," HICKMAN, KENTUCKY
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2143

PROPERTY OF A NEW YORK COLLECTOR

Abraham Lincoln
AUTOGRAPH ENDORSEMENT SIGNED ("A. LINCOLN”) AS SIXTEENTH PRESIDENT, ON A MANUSCRIPT PETITION TO LINCOLN FROM "MANY CITIZENS OF LOYALTY," HICKMAN, KENTUCKY
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拍品詳情

Fine Manuscript and Printed Americana

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Abraham Lincoln
AUTOGRAPH ENDORSEMENT SIGNED ("A. LINCOLN”) AS SIXTEENTH PRESIDENT, ON A MANUSCRIPT PETITION TO LINCOLN FROM "MANY CITIZENS OF LOYALTY," HICKMAN, KENTUCKY
4 lines, [Washington], early December 1864, on the verso of the second leaf of the manuscript petition, Hickman, Kentucky, 6 December 1864, 2 pages (9 1/8 x 7 in.; 232 x 173 mm) on a bifolium of blue-ruled machine-laid paper; stained at upper margin of first leaf, a few very short fold separations.
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來源

Sotheby's, 21 June 2007, lot 59 (undesignated consignor)

相關資料

Border-state loyalists implore President Lincoln to establish a permanent military post at Hickman. This citizens’ petition was carried to Lincoln by Parson N. N. Cowgill. Because of daily raids by rebel forces, which the Unionists had no power to repel, they ask the president "to instruct our commander Brig. Genl. Meredith to make a permanent military post at this place.” The petition goes on to enthusiastically elaborate the benefits of such a plan: "We dont ask it for our own protection exclusively, but for the great benefit it will be to the Federal Army; we have a district of country comprising some 6 or 8 counties, (in area) about two hundred miles! it being varied in its products, offers every inducement to the Federal government to have it protected, and let all of its resources be brought forward to sustain our army, our worthy and truly Union friends. Parson N. N. Cowgill can give you a correct topography of our place and country. We would ask of you to extend our most appreciable Commander’s district to the Hatchie River as this point is the natural outlet for all the cotton and tobacco raised in that section of the country!” The petition concludes with the optimistic observation that Unionists "trust in Divine Providence [that] you may be awakened to our great necessity, and grant us the humble request we have made of you!”

The citizens of Hickman were joined in their request by General Solomon Meredith, who had led the "Iron Brigade" at Chancellorsville and was at the time commander of the post at Paducah, Kentucky. On 9 December, Meredith added this note to the integral blank of the petition: "I am personally acquainted with Parson N. N. Cowgill and know him to be an honest, patriotic and loyal man. The petition of which he is the bearer asking that Hickman be made a permanent military post I would most earnestly recommend to be granted.  The Government will be benefited equally with the citizens by adopting the course proposed, and the benefit both receive will be so much taken from the enemy who now occupy in little squads of guerrillas the whole country in that vicinity, and run off every thing of value to their army which they can lay hands on."

Lincoln forwarded the petition to Edwin Stanton: "Submitted to the Sec. of War who is requested to see the bearer." Perhaps in response to Lincoln's endorsement, General Meredith added a postscript: "I strongly recomend that a military post may be established at Hickman Ky. by the Secy of War." While Hickman did not receive a permanent military post, in August, Lincoln had declared martial law in this area of Kentucky, suspending the writ of habeas corpus to empower Union commanders such as Meredith to unilaterally arrest Confederate spies, sympathizers and bandits.   

 

 

Fine Manuscript and Printed Americana

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紐約