2054
2054

PROPERTY OF VARIOUS OWNERS

Faden, William
A PLAN OF NEW YORK ISLAND WITH PART OF LONG ISLAND, STATEN ISLAND & EAST NEW JERSEY, WITH A PARTICULAR DESCRIPTION OF THE ENGAGEMENT ON THE WOODY HEIGHTS OF LONG ISLAND, BETWEEN FLATBUSH AND BROOKLYN, ON THE 27TH OF AUGUST 1776.  LONDON: WILLIAM FADEN, CA. 1776 - 1777
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2054

PROPERTY OF VARIOUS OWNERS

Faden, William
A PLAN OF NEW YORK ISLAND WITH PART OF LONG ISLAND, STATEN ISLAND & EAST NEW JERSEY, WITH A PARTICULAR DESCRIPTION OF THE ENGAGEMENT ON THE WOODY HEIGHTS OF LONG ISLAND, BETWEEN FLATBUSH AND BROOKLYN, ON THE 27TH OF AUGUST 1776.  LONDON: WILLIAM FADEN, CA. 1776 - 1777
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拍品詳情

Fine Manuscript and Printed Americana

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紐約

Faden, William
A PLAN OF NEW YORK ISLAND WITH PART OF LONG ISLAND, STATEN ISLAND & EAST NEW JERSEY, WITH A PARTICULAR DESCRIPTION OF THE ENGAGEMENT ON THE WOODY HEIGHTS OF LONG ISLAND, BETWEEN FLATBUSH AND BROOKLYN, ON THE 27TH OF AUGUST 1776.  LONDON: WILLIAM FADEN, CA. 1776 - 1777
Copper engraved battle plan on two joined sheets (22 1/2 x 29 7/8 ins; 765 x 505 mm). with hand coloring. Some minor matt burn from previous framing. Matted and framed.
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出版

Nebenzahl Atlas, pl. 12; Nebenzahl Battle Plans, 107; Tooley American 41e.

相關資料

The British Account of the Battle of Long Island

This large-paper issue of a detailed, partially hand-colored map of the British invasion of New York City was first published “according to Act of Parliament, Octr 19th 1776” within weeks of the Battle of Long Island. Below the map in four columns is a detailed account of the Battle of Long Island taken from General Howe’s letter to Lord Germain from his camp at New Town, Long Island (present-day Elmhurst, Queens) on September 3, 1776. This printing is the fifth and final state, showing the American retreat north up Manhattan Island and British occupation of New York on September 15.

“The inhabitants of Long Island, many of whom had been forced into rebellion, have all submitted, and are ready to take the oaths of allegiance… the rebels abandoned all their posts and works of Long Island, and retired with great precipitation across the East river to the town of New York.”

The above quote from the text is an interesting spin on General Howe's controversial decision to halt the British attack, despite the protests of many of his officers. Instead of a direct assault, Howe favored a siege, believing that the Americans were trapped by his army and the British navy’s control of the East River. On August 29, Washington’s officers counseled retreat, and during the night, all 9,000 American troops were evacuated to Manhattan Island without loss. Howe had very much let the rebels slip through his grasp.

Fine Manuscript and Printed Americana

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