324
324
Knauss, Friedrich von (1724-1789)
SELBSTSCHREIBENDE WUNDERMASCHINEN, AUCH MEHR ANDERE KUNST- UND MEISTERSTÜCKE. VIENNA: FOR THE AUTHOR BY SCHULZ-GASTHEIM, 1780
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324
Knauss, Friedrich von (1724-1789)
SELBSTSCHREIBENDE WUNDERMASCHINEN, AUCH MEHR ANDERE KUNST- UND MEISTERSTÜCKE. VIENNA: FOR THE AUTHOR BY SCHULZ-GASTHEIM, 1780
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拍品詳情

厄文‧托馬許藏書: 運算的歷史

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倫敦

Knauss, Friedrich von (1724-1789)
SELBSTSCHREIBENDE WUNDERMASCHINEN, AUCH MEHR ANDERE KUNST- UND MEISTERSTÜCKE. VIENNA: FOR THE AUTHOR BY SCHULZ-GASTHEIM, 1780
FIRST EDITION, 4to (215 x 153mm.), engraved portrait frontispiece (by Mansfeld) and 10 plates (9 folding), errata at end, woodcut ornaments, uncut, early nineteenth-century half calf gilt, some dust-marking to edges
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來源

bought from Helmut Schumann, Zurich, 1986

出版

Tomash & Williams K53; Peter R. Frank & Johannes Frimmel, Buchwesen in Wien 1750-1850 (Wiesbaden, 2008), pp.179-180; VD18 10612114

相關資料

Knauss was a watchmaker and inventor of automata, including a clockwork musician that played a simple flageolet, and some sets of talking heads. Here the author describes and illustrates several automatic writing machines, designed to replicate handwritten pages simultaneously with the creation of the original, using pens and ink. Knauss's contraptions foreshadow the "Polygraph" machine that Thomas Jefferson used extensively from 1804, to produce copies of his signature. A later mechanical development is the "Autopen", used by Harry Truman, Kennedy and other American presidents (and celebrities); this reproduces a signature from a matrix originally created by the signer, but without the signer being present. Throughout the nineteenth century office-clerks used a completely different wet-transfer process to create retained copies of outgoing correspondence.

厄文‧托馬許藏書: 運算的歷史

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倫敦