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ANOTHER KIND OF LANGUAGE: DRAWINGS BY SCULPTORS FROM THE BETSY WITTEN COLLECTION

Dan Flavin
ON NO. 4 OF JUNE 16, 1964
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15

ANOTHER KIND OF LANGUAGE: DRAWINGS BY SCULPTORS FROM THE BETSY WITTEN COLLECTION

Dan Flavin
ON NO. 4 OF JUNE 16, 1964
前往

拍品詳情

當代藝術

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紐約

Dan Flavin
1933-1996年
ON NO. 4 OF JUNE 16, 1964
signed, titled and dated 8/4/64 and June 16, 1964
crayon on black French rag paper
12 3/8 by 9 3/8 in. 31.4 by 23.8 cm.
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來源

John Weber Gallery, New York
Collection of Joseph E. Seagram & Sons, Inc., New York
Acquired from the above by the present owner

展覽

The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts; Vancouver Art Gallery; Calgary, The Nickle Arts Museum; New York, Seagram Building; Ontario, London Regional Art Gallery, Drawings by Sculptors: Two Decades of Non-Objective Art in the Seagram Collection, May 1984 - June 1985, p. 29, illustrated
New York, Dominique Lévy Gallery, Drawing Then: Innovation and Influence in American Drawings of the Sixties, January - March 2016

相關資料

“The lit tubes are intense and very definite. They are very much a particular visible state, a phenomenon. The singleness of isolation phenomena is new to art and highly interesting.” Donald Judd

Exceptionally rare within the artist’s oeuvre, Dan Flavin’s On No. 4 of June 16, 1964 is a seminal early work that captures the genesis of the progression of the artist’s conceptual development. Consisting of two blue and two yellow lines stretching diagonally across the picture plane, the work is a skillfully simplified permutation of The Diagonal of May 25, 1963, the first sculpture by the artist to solely use fluorescent light tubes. In Flavin’s visual vocabulary, these lines, luminescing against the black background, represent the aforementioned tubes and allow for near infinite combinations of form and color through a highly minimal language. Describing his works on paper, Flavin stated, “all my diagrams, even the oldest, seem applicable again and continually. It is as though my system synonymizes its past, present and future states without incurring loss of relevance” (Dan Flavin in Artforum, December 1966, pp. 27-29). Following this logic, On No. 4 of June 1964, in its reduced linear elegance, is far more than a study in line and color. Instead, the work speaks to interactions of light and space, and the unlimited possibilities therein.    

當代藝術

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