956
956
A VERY FINE AND RARE WILLIAM AND MARY TURNED AND JOINED GUMWOOD ‘FLAT’ GATELEG TRESTLE-BASE TABLE, NEW YORK, CIRCA 1715
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956
A VERY FINE AND RARE WILLIAM AND MARY TURNED AND JOINED GUMWOOD ‘FLAT’ GATELEG TRESTLE-BASE TABLE, NEW YORK, CIRCA 1715
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拍品詳情

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

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A VERY FINE AND RARE WILLIAM AND MARY TURNED AND JOINED GUMWOOD ‘FLAT’ GATELEG TRESTLE-BASE TABLE, NEW YORK, CIRCA 1715
Height 25 3/4 in. by Width 40 in. by Depth 37 3/4 in.: 65.4 by 101.6 by 95.9 cm.
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來源

Herbert Schiffer, Exton, Pennsylvania, March 1978;
Vogel Collection no. 295.

相關資料

This trestle-base table was a popular form for Hudson River Valley settlers.  While surviving English examples are antecedents to this form, they are not apparently made in any other early American colony.  The turning sequence on the support legs generally follow four templates; stacked balusters, such as found on this example, single baluster, opposing balusters, and baluster above a ball flanked by reels. The currently offered lot is most similar to a table that purportedly belonged to Abraham Ten Broeck (1734-1810) of Albany, New York. For additional information on related tables see Peter M. Kenny, “Flat Gates, Draw Bars, Twists, and Urns: New York’s Distinctive, Early Baroque Oval Tables with Falling Leaves,” American Furniture 1994, ed. Luke Beckerdite, (Milwaukee, WI: Chipstone Foundation, 1994), p. 106-35 and Frances Gruber Safford, American Furniture in the Metropolitan Museum of Art: Early Colonial Period: the Seventeenth-Century and William and Mary Styles ,(New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2007), p. 159-61, no. 65.

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

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紐約