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THE HIGHLY IMPORTANT 'TURTLE ABRAM' FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR POLYCHROME-DECORATED MAP PRESENTATION POWDER HORN, JOHNSON HALL, JOHNSTOWN, NEW YORK, MAY 24, 1763
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1121
THE HIGHLY IMPORTANT 'TURTLE ABRAM' FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR POLYCHROME-DECORATED MAP PRESENTATION POWDER HORN, JOHNSON HALL, JOHNSTOWN, NEW YORK, MAY 24, 1763
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拍品詳情

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

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THE HIGHLY IMPORTANT 'TURTLE ABRAM' FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR POLYCHROME-DECORATED MAP PRESENTATION POWDER HORN, JOHNSON HALL, JOHNSTOWN, NEW YORK, MAY 24, 1763
the rectangular reserve inscribed Turtel...Abram his...horn for his aide to ye crown 24th MAY ANo DOMI 1763 AT YE HALL FROM HIS GOOD FRIEND JOHN JOHNSON.
Length 18 in.; 45.7 cm.
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來源

Donald Hendrick Collection;
Anthony Sassi, Fort Plain, New York;
R.H. Blackburn & Associates, Kinderhook, New York, January 2002;
Vogel Collection no. 704.

相關資料

This remarkable horn is an exceptionally rare presentation French and Indian War horn.  It was given to Mohawk Chief Turtle Abraham by Sir John Johnson (1741-1830).  Sir John was the only surviving child of Sir William Johnson (1715-1774) and Molly Brant, a Mohawk Indian.  Sir William settled approximately 30 miles northwest of Schenectady, New York in what is now called Johnstown, New York and built in 1763 a grand Georgian house called Johnson Hall. His success in dealing with the Six Nations of the Iroquois greatly influenced England's victory over France for control of colonial North America. For his service, the British Crown bestowed upon Johnson the title of Baronet, and later appointed him Superintendent of Indian Affairs, a position to which he devoted himself and held throughout his life.

Chief Turtle Abraham, was the brother of Chief King Hendrick Theyanoguin (Tee Yee Ho Ga Row) (c. 1691–1755). Chief Hendrick formed a close alliance with Sir William and was one of the "four Indian kings" who visited England and Queen Anne in 1710.  Upon his death his brother Turtle Abraham became chief. 

Sir William was seen as the facilitator of detente with the Iroquois nations and was a proponent of awarding gifts to Native leaders. He realized that they considered it an important cultural symbol of respect and significant in maintaining good relations.  This astonishing horn was presented on May 24, 1763 which remarkably is the same moment that the Pontiac's Rebellion was launched because of the giving of smallpox-infected blankets.  This horn’s presentation could be directly linked to the inept leadership of General Jeffery Amherst.

In 1763, Pontiac's War resulted from Native American discontent with British policy following the French and Indian War. For several years prior to the uprising, Johnson had advised General Jeffery Amherst to observe Iroquois diplomatic practices, for instance, awarding gifts to Native leaders, a practice they considered an important cultural symbol of respect and significant to maintaining good relations. Amherst, who rejected Johnson's advice, was recalled to London and replaced by General Thomas Gage.

This horn stands as a historical icon of mid-eighteenth century British and Native American affairs.

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

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