David Annesley (born 1936)

Annesley studied under Anthony Caro in the sculpture department at St Martin’s. He exhibited in solo shows at Waddington Galleries, London (1966) and Poindexter Gallery, New York (1966). He represented Britain at the Biennale de Paris (1961) and achieved early success when his work was selected for Young Contemporaries, RBA Galleries, London (1961, 1962). He exhibited in key group shows including Primary Structures: Younger American and British Sculpture, Jewish Museum of New York (1966); New British Sculpture, Arnolfini, Bristol (1968); Contemporary Sculpture from the Collection, Museum of Modern Art, New York (1979); Formal Situations: Abstraction in Britain 1960–1970, Tate, Liverpool (2003) and New Generation Revisited: British Sculpture from the Sixties and Seventies, New Art Centre, Salisbury (2008). His sculpture is held in many public collections including Arts Council, London; British Council; Tate; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Nagoya Gallery, Japan and Gallery of New South Wales, Australia.

Keith Arnatt (1930–2008)

Arnatt studied at Oxford School of Art and Royal Academy Schools. He had solo exhibitions in Amsterdam (1970); Whitechapel Gallery, London (1977); Photographers’ Gallery, London (1989); Bienal de São Paulo (1991) and Tate (2013). He exhibited in important group shows including Konzeption-Conception, Städtiches Museum, Leverkusen (1969); Information, Museum of Modern Art, New York (1970); The New Art, Hayward Gallery, London (1972); Arte Inglese Oggi, Palazzo Reale, Milan (1976); Ten Contemporary British Photographers, M.I.T., Boston (1982); The New British Document, Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago (1986); Self Evident: the Artist as the Subject 1969–2002, Tate (2002) and Behind the Facts Interfunktionen 1968–75, Fundació Joan Miró, Barcelona (2003). His work is held in the collections of Arts Council, London; British Council and Tate.


Gillian Ayres (born 1930)

Ayres studied at Camberwell School of Art. After working for AIA Gallery, she taught at Bath Academy of Art and St Martin’s and then became Head of Painting at Winchester School of Art. She first exhibited in solo shows at Gallery One, London (1956); Kara Benson Gallery, Oslo (1957); Molton Gallery, London (1960, 1962); Kasmin Ltd., London (1965, 1966, 1969) and Galeria Alvarez, Porto, Portugal (1977). She exhibited with Knoedler Gallery in London and New York from 1979 and a retrospective of her work was held at the Serpentine Gallery, London (1983). Ayres continues to exhibit regularly with Alan Cristea Gallery, London. Ayres was the only female artist in Situation, RBA Galleries, London (1961) and participated in other important group shows including British Painting in the Sixties, Whitechapel Gallery, London (1963); British Painting: The New Generation, Museum of Modern Art, New York (1967, 1969) and Recent British Painting, Tate (1967). Her work appears in many international collections including British Council; Tate; Royal Academy, London; Arts Council, London; Museum of Modern Art, New York and Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon.


Clive Barker (born 1940)

Barker studied at Luton College of Technology and Art before working on the assembly line at Vauxhall Motors where he discovered thesculptural potential of industrial objects. He exhibited at Robert Fraser Gallery, London (1968); Hanover Gallery, London (1969); Anthony d’ Offay, London (1974); Galleria Arte e Arte, Bologna (2004); Sloan Fine Art, New York (2008) and Whitford Fine Art, London (2009). Barker was in important group exhibitions including Young Contemporaries, RBA Galleries, London (1962); New Idioms, Robert Fraser Gallery, London (1966); 118 Show, Kasmin Ltd., London (1964); Young British Artists, Museum of Modern Art, New York (1968); British Artists of the 60s, Tate (1977); Objects for the Ideal Home: The Legacy of Pop Art, Serpentine Gallery, London (1991); D’Après l’Antique, Musée du Louvre, Paris (2000) and Pop Art: U.S./U.K. Connections, 1956–1966, Menil Collection, Houston, Texas (2001). Barker is represented in international collections including Arts Council, London; British Council; National Portrait Gallery, London; Tate; Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, D.C. and Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt, Germany.


Peter Blake (born 1932)

Blake studied at Gravesend School of Art and Royal College of Art. He has held solo shows at Portal Gallery, London (1962); Robert Fraser Gallery, London (1965); Leslie Waddington Prints, London (1969); Galleria Documenta, Turin (1980); Tate (1983); Galerie Claude Bernard, Paris (1984); Nishimura Gallery, Tokyo (1988); Govinda Gallery, Washington, D.C. (1992); Paul Morris Gallery, New York (2002) and Wetterling Gallery, Stockholm (2012). Blake was selected for key group shows including British Painting in the Sixties, Whitechapel Gallery, London (1962); Troisième Biennale de Paris, Musée d’Art Moderne, Paris (1963); London: The New Scene, Walker Art Centre, Minneapolis (1965); British Painting and Sculpture 1960–1970, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. (1970); Ready, Steady, Go: Painting of the Sixties from the Arts Council Collection, Royal Festival Hall, London (1992) and Blast to Freeze: British Art in the 20th Century, Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg, Germany. Blake’s work is held in public collections at Tate; Arts Council, London; British Council; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Museum Moderner Kunst, Vienna; Museum Boymans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam and Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon.


Derek Boshier (born 1937)

Boshier studied at the Royal College of Art and taught at the Central School of Art and Design, Hornsey College of Art, Royal College of Art and University of Houston, Texas. He exhibited at Grabowski Gallery, London (1962); Biennale de Paris (1963); Galerie Aujourd’hui, Brussels (1965); Robert Fraser Gallery, London (1965, 1968); Galerie Bichofsberger, Zurich (1967); Galerie Bucholz, Munich (1970); Angela Flowers Gallery, London (1979); Robin Cronin Gallery, Houston (1982); Fahey/Klein Gallery, Los Angeles (1990); Flowers Gallery, New York (2013) and at museums such as Whitechapel Gallery, London (1973); ICA, London (1982) and Miskan Le Ormanut Museum of Art, Ein Harod, Israel (1997). Boshier participated in landmark group shows Pop Art in Britain, RBA Galleries, London (1962); Image in Progress, Grabowski Gallery, London (1962); The New Generation, Whitechapel Gallery, London (1964); Englische Grafik, Galerie Gabriele von Loeper, Hamburg (1970) as well as the Third Paris Biennale des Jeunes, Musée d’Art Moderne, Paris (1963). His work is held in a number of public collections including the British Council; Tate; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Menil Collection, Houston; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Peter Stuyvesant Collection, Holland; Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon and Museum of Art, Ein Harod, Israel.

Mark Boyle & Joan HiIls (The Boyle Family)

The Boyle Family exhibited at ICA, London (1968); Henie-Onstad Kunstsenter, Høvikodden, Oslo (1985); Hayward Gallery, London (1986); Museum Sztuki, Lodz (1987); Richard Gray Gallery, Chicago (1988); Paco Imperial, Rio de Janeiro (1988); Galerie Lelong, Paris (1988); Turske and Turske, Zurich (1989); Gallerie Friedman-Guinness, Frankfurt (1990); Nishimura Gallery, Tokyo (1990); Auckland City Art Gallery, Auckland (1990) and Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh (2003). The Boyle family represented Britain at Biennale di Venice (1978) and Bienal de São Paulo (1987) and has been included in Terra Firma, Columbia University Gallery, New York (1989); The Sixties Art Scene in London, Barbican Art Gallery, London (1993); Transistors, Hashimoto Museum of Art, Morioka (1998) and Twelve Travels, British Art in Sensibility and Experience, Tochigi Prefectural Museum of Fine Arts, Tochigi (2008). Their work is held in collections worldwide including Arts Council, London; British Council; Tate; Henry Art Gallery, Seattle; Carnegie Institute, Pittsburg; Staatsgalerie Stuttgart, Germany;National Gallery of Australia, Canberra and Tokyo Metropolitan Museum, Japan.

 

Anthony Caro (born 1924)

Caro graduated from Cambridge with a degree in engineering and joined Regent Street Polytechnic and the Royal Academy Schools. His first solo exhibition was at Galleria del Naviglio, Milan (1956) followed by Gimpel Fils, London (1957); Andre Emmerich Gallery, New York (1964); Kasmin Ltd., London (1965); Gallery Kasahara, Osaka (1979); Nabis Gallery, Seoul (1989); Annely Juda Fine Art, London (1994) and Marlborough Gallery, New York (2000). Museum shows include Whitechapel Gallery, London (1963); Museum of Modern Art, New York (1975); Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (1975) and Tate (2005). He was involved in important group shows including New London Situation, Marlborough New London Gallery, London (1961); Documenta III, Kassel, Germany (1964); Seven Sculptors, Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia (1965) and Noland, Caro and Morris Louis, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (1968). Caro represented Britain in the Biennale di Venice in 1958, 1966, 1968, 1972, 1986, 1988, 1999 and 2013. Caro’s work is held in public collections including Arts Council, London; Tate; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice and National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.

 

Patrick Caulfield (1936–2005)

Caulfield studied at the Royal College of Art and Chelsea School Art. He held solo exhibitions at Robert Fraser Gallery, London (1965, 1967); Waddington Galleries (1969, 1971, 1973, 1975); Tortue Gallery, Santa Monica, California (1977); Nishimura Gallery, Tokyo (1982); Alan Cristea Gallery, London (1999); Galerie Papillon-Fiat, Paris (2001) as well as museum shows at Tate (1978); National Museum of Fine Art, Rio de Janeiro (1985); Serpentine Gallery, London (1992-1993); Hayward Gallery, London (1999); Tate, Liverpool (2006) and Tate (2013). His work was included in key 1960s exhibitions Young Contemporaries, RBA Galleries, London (1961, 1962, 1963); The New Generation, Whitechapel Gallery, London (1964); Painting 1964–1967, Hayward Gallery, London (1968) and Pop Art, Hayward Gallery, London (1969). His work is represented in Arts Council, London; Tate; Harry N. Abrams Family Collection, New York; Hirshhorn Museum, Washington D.C.; Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon and Tochigi Prefectural Museum of Fine Arts, Japan.

 

Bernard Cohen (born 1933)

Cohen studied at Central St Martin’s and Slade School of Fine Art. Solo exhibitions include Gimpel Fils, London (1958); Kasmin Ltd., London (1963); Betty Parsons Gallery, New York (1967); Hayward Gallery, London (1972); Galleria Annunciata, Milan (1973); Tate (1976); Gallery Omana, Osaka, Japan (1977) and Flowers, London (2007). He was included in important group shows such as Situation, RBA Galleries, London (1960); New London Situation, Marlborough New London Gallery (1961); British Paintings in the Sixties, Whitechapel Gallery, London (1963); 54/64: Painting and Sculpture of a Decade, Tate (1964); Documenta III, Kassel, Germany (1964); Arte Inglese Oggi, Palazzo Reale, Milan (1976) and Summer of Love – Art of the Psychedelic Era, Tate (2005). His work is represented in major public collections including Tate; British Council; Art Council, London and Bernardo Collection, Portugal.

 

Harold Cohen (born 1928)

Cohen studied and taught at Slade School of Art. He also taught at St Martin’s, Ealing School of Art and Bromley School of Art. Solo exhibitions of Cohen’s work include those at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford (1950); Whitechapel Gallery, London (1965); Biennale di Venice (1966) and Museum of Modern Art, Oxford (1968). Cohen was included in important 1960s group shows Situation, RBA Galleries, London (1960); New London Situation, Marlborough New London Gallery, London (1961) and Documenta III, Kassel, Germany (1964). He has exhibited regularly at the Robert Fraser Gallery, London and Alan Stone Gallery, New York. Cohen’s work is held in many public collections including the Arts Council, London; Tate; Art Gallery of Toronto, Canada; Stedelijk Museum,Amsterdam and National Gallery of Western Australia.

 

Robyn Denny (born 1930)

Denny trained in Paris before studying at St Martin’s and Royal College of Art. He held solo exhibitions at Gallery One, London (1958); Gimpel Fils, London (1958); Galleria Scacchi Gracco, Milan (1962); Galerie Müller, Stuttgart (1963); Robert Elkon Gallery, New York (1966); Renée Ziegler, Zurich (1968) and Tate (1973). Denny participated in group shows including Metavisual, Tachiste, Abstract, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Liège (1957); British Painting, Smithsonian Institute, Washington D.C. (1958-59); Art of Assemblage, Museum of Modern Art, New York (1961); Tokyo Biennale (1963); Biennale di Venice (1966); British Painting and Sculpture 1960-70, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. (1970); Contemporary British Art, National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo (1970); Home and Abroad, Serpentine Gallery, London (1984) and Transition: The London Art Scene in the 50s, Barbican Art Centre, London (2002). Denny’s work is represented in Arts Council, London; Tate; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Walker Art Gallery, Minneapolis and National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.

 

Rita Donagh (born 1939)

Donagh taught at the University of Reading, Slade School of Art, Goldsmiths-University of London and University of Newcastle, where she met her husband, the artist, Richard Hamilton. She exhibited at Whitworth Gallery, Manchester (1977); Ikon Gallery, Birmingham (2005) and Hugh Lane Gallery, Dublin recently hosted a retrospective exhibition of her work, as well as Hamilton’s, in 2011.

 

Barry Flanagan (1941–2009)

Flanagan briefly studied architecture at Birmingham College of Art before joining St Martin’s. He held solo exhibitions at Rowan Gallery (1966, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974); Galerie Ricke, Cologne (1968); Art and Project, Amsterdam (1975); Museum of Modern Art, New York (1974); Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris (1983); Pace Gallery, New York (1983); Tate, Liverpool (2002) and Tate (2011). Flanagan represented Britain at Biennale di Venice (1982). He also appeared in crucial group shows including Between Poetry and Painting, ICA, London (1965); Young Contemporaries, RBA Galleries, London (1966); Tokyo Biennale (1967) and Young British Artists: Six Painters, Six Sculptors, Museum of Modern Art, New York (1968). Flanagan is represented in public collections including Tate; Guggenheim Museum, New York; Kunsthaus Public Collection, Zurich; Rijksmuseum Kröller Müller, Netherlands and Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris.

 

Richard Hamilton (1922–2011)

Hamilton studied briefly at Royal Academy Schools and Slade School of Fine Art. He held solo exhibitions at Hanover Gallery, London (1955) and Robert Fraser Gallery, London (1966, 1969). Major museum shows were organised by Tate (1970, 1992); Guggenheim Museum, New York (1973); Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin (1974) and a retrospective of his work will be held at Tate in 2014. His work was included in Documenta IV, Kassel (1968); Bienal de São Paulo (1989); Biennale di Venice (1993); Documenta X, Kassel (1997) and Gwangju Biennale (2004). Hamilton’s work is represented in public collections including Arts Council, London; British Council; Tate; Guggenheim Museum, New York and Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, D.C.

 

David Hockney (born 1937)

After studying at Bradford School of Art (1953-57), Hockney arrived at the Royal College of Art in London where he became the standout figure amongst an exciting generation of students that included Derek Boshier, Allen Jones, Patrick Caulfield and R.B. Kitaj. He held solo exhibitions at Kasmin Ltd., London (1963, 1965, 1968, 1972); Museum of Modern Art, New York (1964); Palais Des Beaux-Arts, Brussels (1966); Galleria Dell’ariete, Milan (1966); Galerie Claude Bernard, Paris (1981); Nishimura Gallery, Tokyo (1989); Hamburger Kunsthalle, Germany (1995-96) and Royal Academy, London (2012-13). His work appears in many public collections including Tate; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris and Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo.

 

Howard Hodgkin (born 1932)

Hodgkin studied at Camberwell School of Art alongside Gillian Ayres and Harry Mundy and continued his education at Bath Academy of Art. He held solo shows at Arthur Tooth and Sons, London (1962, 1964, 1965); Gallerie Müller, Cologne (1971); Kornblee Gallery, New York (1973); Andre Emmerich Gallery, Zurich (1977-78) and more recently at Gagosian Gallery, New York (1998). Solo museum shows were held at the Museum of Modern Art, Oxford (1984); Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas (1995); Tate (2006) and Metropolitan Museum, New York (2010). He exhibited in group shows including Two Young Figurative Painters, ICA, London (1962); New Scene, Walker Art Centre, London (1965); Patrick Caulfield, Howard Hodgkin, Michael Moon, Gallerie Stadler, Paris (1972); A New Spirit in Painting, Royal Academy, London (1981) and Brancusi to Beuys – from the Ted Power Collection, Tate (1996). He also represented Britain in Biennale di Venice (1984). Hodgkin’s paintings are held in many public collections including Tate; National Portrait Gallery, London; Arts Council, London; British Council; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York and Art Gallery of Ontario, Canada.

 

Gordon House (1932–2004)

House studied at Luton School of Art and St Albans School of Art. He held solo exhibitions at New Vision Centre, London (1959); Galleria Trastevere, Rome (1962); Robert Fraser Gallery, London (1967); Marlborough-Gerson Gallery, New York (1968) and Kunstsalon Wolfsberg, Zurich (1970). House also participated in important group exhibitions including the first incarnation of Situation (1960) and its later re-assembly as an Arts Council tour (1962-3). House’s works are held in a number of public collections including Tate; Arts Council, London; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh and National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.

 

John Hoyland (1934–2011)

Hoyland was educated at Sheffield School of Art, Royal Academy Schools and Central School of Art. He held solo exhibitions at Marlborough New London Gallery, London (1964); Nicholas Wilder Gallery, Los Angeles (1967); Robert Elkon Gallery, New York; Galerie Heiner Friedrich, Munich and Bienal de São Paulo (1969). Museum shows were held at Whitechapel Gallery, London (1967); Serpentine Gallery, London (1979); Royal Academy, London (1999) and Tate, St. Ives (2006). He also exhibited in important group shows such as Situation, RBA Galleries, London; New London Situation, Marlborough New London Gallery, London (1960, 1961); The New Generation: 1964, Whitechapel Gallery, London (1964); British Painting and Sculpture 1960–1970, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. (1970-71) and Aspects of British Art Today, Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum (1982). His works are found in many public collections including Arts Council, London; Courtauld, London; Tate and Museum of Modern Art, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

 

Gwyther Irwin (1931–2008)

Irwin initially studied illustration at Goldsmiths College of Art before turning to fabric design at Central School. He exhibited regularly in solo shows at Gimpel Fils and was involved in many important group exhibitions during the 1960s including Situation, RBA Galleries, London; British Painting in the Sixties, Whitechapel Gallery, London (1963); Biennale di Venice (1964) and The First Sixty: Watercolours and Related Oil Paintings, Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge (1981). His work can be found in many public collections including Tate; Arts Council, London; Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven and Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice.

 

Allen Jones (born 1937)

Jones studied painting and lithography at Hornsey College of Art before attending Royal College of Art. He exhibited at Arthur Tooth and Sons, London (1963, 1964, 1967); Richard Feigen Gallery, New York (1964); Gallerie Bischofberger, Zurich (1966) and also in museum shows at ICA, London (1978); Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool (1979) and Barbican Art Gallery, London (1995). He was included in important group exhibitions such as Young Contemporaries, RBA Galleries, London (1960, 1961); Two Young Figurative Painters, ICA, London (1962); The New Generation, Whitechapel Gallery, London (1964) and London: The New Art Scene, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (1965-1966). Jones’s works are held by public institutions including Tate; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Vancouver Art Gallery, Canada; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam and Nagaoka Museum, Japan.

 

Michael Kidner (1917–2009)

Kidner studied History and Anthropology at Cambridge and Landscape Architecture at Ohio State University. Solo exhibitions of his work were held at St Hilda’s College, Oxford (1959); Grabowski Gallery, London (1962, 1964); Betty Parsons Gallery, New York (1967) and Jacomo Santiveri Gallery, Paris (1975). Museum shows were held at Serpentine Gallery, London (1984); Escola De Artes Visuais, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (1988); Centre for International Contemporary Arts, New York City (1990); Henry Moore Institute, Leeds (1997) and Royal Academy, London (2009). Kidner was represented in the key group shows The Responsive Eye, Museum of Modern Art, New York (1965); New Exhibition, Penwith Society, St Ives (1957) and Systems, Whitechapel Gallery, London (1972). His work can be found in many collections including Tate; Arts Council, London; British Council; Museum of Modern Art, New York; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra and Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden.

 

Phillip King (born 1934)

King studied Modern Languages at Cambridge before taking Anthony Caro’s sculpture course at St Martin’s. He exhibited at Heffer’s Gallery, Cambridge (1957) with subsequent shows at Rowan Gallery, London (1964); Richard Feigen Gallery, New York (1966); Nishimura Gallery, Tokyo (1987) as well as Whitechapel Gallery, London (1968); Rijksmuseum Kröller-Müller, Otterlo (1974); Hayward Gallery, London (1981); Musée des Beaux-Arts André Malraux, Le Havre (1993) and Forte de Belvedere, Florence (1997). King was included in important group shows such as Documenta III, Kassel, Germany (1964); The New Generation, Whitechapel (1965) and Biennale di Venice (1968). His work can be found in many public collections including Arts Council, London; British Council; Tate; Los Angeles County Museum, California; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris and the National Museum of Art, Osaka, Japan.

 

Bruce Lacey (born 1927)

Lacey studied at Hornsey School of Art and Royal College of Art in the early 1950s. He held solo exhibitions at Gallery One, London (1964); Marlborough New London Gallery, London (1966); ICA, London (1970) and Whitechapel Gallery, London (1975). In 2012, David Allan Mellor and Jeremy Deller co-curated The Bruce Lacey Experience for the Camden Arts Centre, London. His works can be found in public collections such as the Royal Academy of Art, London and Tate.

 

Gerald Laing (1936–2011)

Laing studied at Central St Martin’s and exhibited at Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle (1963); ICA, London (1964); Richard Feigen Gallery, New York (1964, 1965, 1967, 1969) and Richard Feigen Gallery, Chicago (1966, 1970). He participated in important group shows including Young Contemporaries, RBA Galleries, London (1963); Biennale de Paris (1963); Primary Sculptures, Jewish Museum, New York (1966); Whitney Annual Sculpture Exhibition, Whitney Museum, New York (1968); Objects and Constructions: Selected Scottish Sculpture, Scottish Arts Council Gallery, Edinburgh (1978); The Sixties Art Scene in London, Barbican Art Gallery, London (1993) and Art and the 60’s, Tate (2004). He has works in many public collections including National Gallery, London; Tate; London, Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum, New York and Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh.

 

John Latham (1921–2006)

Latham studied at the Regent Street Polytechnic and Chelsea College of Art. He exhibited at Kingsly Gallery, London (1951); Kasmin Ltd., London (1963); Alan Gallery, New York (1964) and Lisson Gallery, London (1970, 1987). His work appeared in solo museum shows at Städtische Kunsthalle, Düsseldorf (1975); Stedelijk van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven (1983) and Tate (2005-06). He was included in important group shows The Art of Assemblage, Museum of Modern Art, New York (1961-62); Information, Museum of Modern Art, New York (1970); Happening and Fluxus, Kunstverein, Cologne (1970) and Destroy the Picture: Painting the Void 1949–62, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (2013). His works are held by many public collections including Tate; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Musée des Beaux-Arts, Calais and Modern Art Museum, Caracas, Venezuela.

 

Liliane Lijn (born 1939)

Lijn studied Archeology and Art History at the Sorbonne and the École du Louvre, Paris. She exhibited at La Librairie Anglaise, Paris (1963); Indica Gallery, London (1967); Hanover Gallery, London (1970); Serpentine Gallery, London (1976) and La Rocca, Centro d’Arte Contemporaneo, Umbertide, Studio Nardi, Florence (2002). Group exhibitions include Light and Movement, Museum of Modern Art, Paris (1967); Kinetic Art, Hayward Gallery, London (1970); Thinking Big Concepts for Twenty-First Century British Sculpture, Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice (2002) and Art and the ‘60s: This Was Tomorrow, Tate (2003). Her work is held in many public collections including Arts Council, London; Tate; Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Kunstmuseum, Bern, Germany and Museum of New South Wales, Sydney.

 

Jeremy Moon (1934–1973)

Moon read law at Cambridge and worked in advertising before studying at Central School of Art. During his short career Moon regularly exhibited at the Rowan Gallery in the 1960s and 1970s and also at Galerie Müller, Stuttgart (1967); Nishimura Gallery, Tokyo (1978); The Nunnery, London; Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge (2001) and Tate (2007). His work is featured in many collections including Arts Council, London; Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge; Tate; Scottish National Galleries, Edinburgh; Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon; Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney and Museum of Modern Art, Rio de Janeiro.

 

Nicholas Monro (born 1936)

Monro studied at the Chelsea School of Art. He exhibited in solo shows at Robert Fraser Gallery in London as well at Galerie Pribaut in Amsterdam throughout the 1960s. He was included in the group exhibitions Pop Art Re-Assessed, Hayward Gallery (1969); British Pop Art 1956-1972, Galleria Civica di Modena, Italy (2002) and Art and the 60s: This Was Tomorrow, Tate (2004). His work is held in collections including Berardo Museum, Lisbon; Tate; University of Warwick Collection, England and Wolverhampton Art Gallery, England.

 

Eduardo Paolozzi (1924–2005)

Paolozzi studied at Edinburgh College of Art, St Martin’s and Slade School. He had his first solo exhibition at the Mayor Gallery, London (1947) followed by show at Hanover Gallery, London (1958); Betty Parsons Gallery, New York (1960); Biennale di Venice (1960); Robert Fraser Gallery, London (1964, 1966) and Pace Gallery, New York (1966, 1967). Museum shows were held at Museum of Modern Art, New York (1964); Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1968); Städtische Kunsthalle, Düsseldorf (1968); Tate (1971) and National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh (2004). His work is found in public collections including Tate; Arts Council, London; Royal Academy, London; Hunterian Art Gallery, Glasgow; Steinberg Collection, New York; Art Gallery of Ontario, Canada and Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice.

 

Peter Phillips (born 1939)

Phillips studied at Birmingham College of Art, and later the Royal College of Art, London, graduating in 1962. Awarded a Harkness Fellowship in 1964, he travelled to New York and then with Allen Jones across North America in 1965, before settling in Zurich. His first solo exhibition was held at the Kornblee Gallery, New York (1965), with subsequent shows including Kornblee Gallery (1966, 68) and Galerie Bischofberger, Zurich (1968, 1969), and group exhibitions including Young Contemporaries, RBA Galleries, London (1962); Today and Yesterday, Arthur Tooth and Sons, London (1962); International Exhibition of the New Realists, Sidney Janis Gallery, New York (1962); Four Young Artists, Institute of Contemporary Arts, London (1962); British Painting in the Sixties, Whitechapel Gallery, London, (1963); Op and Pop, Moderna Museet, Stockholm (1965); La Figuration narrative dans l’art Contemporain, Galerie Creuze, Paris (1965); Rule Britannia, Feigen/Palmer Gallery, Los Angeles (1964); Primary Structures, Jewish Museum, New York (1966); British Painting, Palais des Beaux-Arts , Brussells (1966), Homage to Marilyn Monroe, Sidney Janis Gallery, New York (1967), British Drawings: The New Generation, Museum of Modern Art, New York (1967); and Pop Art, Hayward Gallery (1969). His work is held in the collections of Tate, London, and is widely reproduced, including featuring on the 1961 cover of the Strokes’ War/Game album.

 

Bridget Riley (born 1931)

Riley studied at Goldsmiths College and Royal College of Art, where her fellow students included Peter Blake and Frank Auerbach. She held solo exhibitions at Gallery One, London (1962, 1963); Richard Feigen Gallery, New York (1964); Feigen Palmer Gallery, Los Angeles (1965); Galerie Beyeler, Basel (1975) and Minami Gallery, Tokyo (1977). Museum shows were held at Museum of Modern Art, New York (1966); Biennale di Venice (1968); Hayward Gallery, London (1971); Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge (1995); Serpentine Gallery, London (1999); Tate (2003) and Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville, Paris (2008). Riley’s participation in The Responsive Eye at MOMA in New York in 1965 confirmed her as an international figure and projected ‘Op’ into the media spotlight. She participated in important group shows including New Generation, Whitechapel Gallery, London (1964); New British Painting and Sculpture, Whitechapel Gallery, London (1968); Documenta IV, Kassel, Germany (1968); A Different Climate, Städtische Kunsthalle, Düsseldorf (1984) and Art and the Sixties, Tate (2004). Riley’s work can be found in many public collections worldwide including Tate; Arts Council, London; British Council; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam and National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo.

 

Tim Scott (born 1937)

Scott trained as an architect and then attended a sculpture course at St Martin’s, where he was one of many students to come under the influence of Anthony Caro’s teaching. He held solo shows at Waddington Galleries, London (1966); Lawrence Rubin Gallery, New York (1969, 1971, 1973); Andre Emmerich Gallery, New York (1974) and solo museum shows at Whitechapel Gallery, London (1967); Tate (1971); Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (1972); Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. (1973) and Westfälisches Landesmuseum, Munich (1988). He was also involved in the group shows 26 Young Sculptors, ICA, London (1961); Mixed Exhibition, Molton Gallery, London (1964); Primary Structures, Jewish Museum, New York (1966); Arte Inglese Oggi 1960–1976, Palazzo Reale, Milan (1976) and Tra-la-la: British Sculpture in the Sixties, Tate (2002). His works are held in collections at Tate; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Edmonton Art Gallery, Alberta and Wilhelm Lehmbruck Museum, Duisberg.

 

Colin Self (born 1941)

Self studied at Norwich School of Art and Slade where his draughtsmanship caught the attention of David Hockney and Peter Blake. He exhibited at Robert Fraser Gallery, London (1965); Piccadilly Gallery, London (1965); Galerie Yvon Lambert, Paris (1966); Galerie Hans Neuendorf, Hamburg (1968); Mayor Gallery, London (2006) and Richard Saltoun, London (2008). Museum solo shows were held at the Norwich School of Art (1975); ICA, London (1986); Tate (1995-96); and Pallant House Gallery, Chichester (2008). Self’s work has been included in important group exhibitions at the Musée d’Art Moderne, Paris (1968); Hayward Gallery, London (1969, 1975-6); Museum of Modern Art, New York (1970, 1971); Tate (1982, 1984) and Royal Academy, London (1991, 1992). His works can be found in public collections including Tate; Arts Council, London; Pallant House, Chichester and Museum of Modern Art, New York.

 

Jack Smith (1928–2011)

Smith studied at Sheffield College of Art, St Martin’s and Royal College of Art. He showed at Beaux Arts (1953) and won first prize at John Moores Liverpool Exhibition (1956). He was included in the Biennale di Venice (1956) and held exhibitions at Whitechapel Gallery, London (1959, 1971) and Serpentine Gallery, London (1978). His works are held in many public collections including Tate; Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge; Arts Council, London; British Council; National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh and Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris.

 

Richard Smith (born 1931)

Smith studied at the Luton School of Art, St Alban’s School of Art and Royal College of Art. His solo exhibitions were held at Green Gallery, New York (1961, 1963, 1965); ICA, London (1962); Kasmin Ltd., London (1963, 1967, 1969); Richard Feigen Gallery, New York (1966, 1968) and Whitechapel Gallery, London (1966). Group shows include Place, ICA, London (1959); Situation, RBA Galleries, London (1960); New London Situation, Marlborough New London Gallery, London (1961); Biennale de Paris (1961); Biennale di Venice (1966); Documenta IV, Kassel, Germany (1968) and Pop Art, Prints, Drawings and Multiples, Museum of Modern Art, New York City (1970). Smith’s work is held in public collections including Arts Council, London; Tate; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Kiasma – Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki and Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art, Tehran.

 

Ian Stephenson (1934–2000)

Stephenson trained at King’s College, Durham, alongside Noel Forster, and later returned to teach there with Victor Pasmore and Richard Hamilton. Stephenson held solo exhibitions at New Art Centre, London throughout the 1960s and at Hayward Gallery (1977). He was included in the film Blow-Up (1966) and the group shows The Independent Eye: Contemporary British Art, Yale Center for British Art, New Haven (2012). Stephenson’s work is in the public collections of Tate; Arts Council, London; Whitworth Art Gallery; British Council; Kettle’s Yard Cambridge and Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon.

 

Joe Tilson (born 1928)

Tilson studied at St Martin’s and Royal College of Art. He held solo exhibitions at Marlborough Gallery, London (1962, 1966, 1967); Biennale di Venice (1964) and Marlborough Graphics Gallery, New York (1966). Museum shows include his first retrospective at Museum Boymans van Beuningen, Rotterdam (1973-74); Tate (1978); Vancouver Art Gallery, Canada (1979); Centro Culturale Fontanella Borghese, Rome (1990) and Royal Academy, London (2002). He exhibited in group shows including British Painting in the Sixties, Whitechapel Gallery, London (1963) and London: The New Scene, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis. Tilson’s work can be found in many public collections including Arts Council, London; British Council; Royal Academy, London; Tate; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; Kunsthalle, Basel and Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam.

 

William Tucker (born 1935)

Tucker studied history at Oxford University and attended Ruskin School of Drawing, Central School of Art and Design and St Martin’s. He exhibited at Grabowski Gallery, London (1962); Rowan Gallery, London (1963, 1966); Richard Feigen, New York (1965) and Kasmin Ltd., London (1967, 1970). He also exhibited in important 1960s shows including 26 Young Sculptors, ICA, London (1960-61); New Generation: 1965, Whitechapel Gallery, London (1965); Primary Structures, Jewish Museum, New York (1966) and Documenta IV, Kassel, Germany (1968). His work can be found in a variety of public collections including Arts Council, London; British Council; Tate; Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, D.C.; Guggenheim Museum, New York; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York and Rijksmuseum Kroller-Muller, Otterlo, Holland.

 

William Turnbull (1922–2012)

After graduating from the Slade School of Art, Turnbull moved to Paris where, like Paolozzi, he came under the influence of Giacometti. He exhibited at Hanover Gallery, London (1950); Molton Gallery, London (1960, 1961); Marlborough Green Gallery, London (1961); Marlborough- Gerson Gallery, New York (1963) and Waddington Galleries, London (1967, 1969, 1970). Museum shows were held at ICA, London (1957); Bienal de São Paulo (1967); Hayward Gallery, London (1968); Tate (1973); Scottish Arts Council, Edinburgh (1974); Serpentine Gallery, London (1995-96) and Tate (2006). Group shows include New Trends in British Art, New York-Rome Art Foundation, Rome (1958); Situation, RBA Galleries, London (1960); Sculpture in the Open Air, Battersea Park (1960); New London Situation, Marlborough New London Gallery (1961) and Documenta IV, Kassel, Germany (1968). His works appear in many public collections including Tate; Arts Council, London; British Council; Hunterian Art Gallery, Glasgow; Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.; Museum of Contemporary Art, New York; Städtisches Museum, Leverkusen, Germany and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Tehran.

 

Brian Young (born 1934)

Young studied at St Martin’s and Central School. He later taught at the Chelsea School of Art and the London College of Printing. He exhibited in Young Contemporary shows at the Rowan and Gimpel Fils Galleries and others such as Situation, RBA Galleries, London (1960); 6 Young Painters: Arts Council, London (1961); Five Young British Artists, Rowan Gallery, London (1966) and Desenhos Britânicos Na Colecção Do Centro De Arte Moderna José De Azeredo Perdigão, Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon (1996). His work is found in the public collections of the Arts Council, London and Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon.


New Situation — Art in London in the Sixties

04-11 SEPTEMBER 2013 | LONDON

 

 

 

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