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THE FLEISHER COLLECTION OF JADES

A FINELY CARVED CELADON AND RUSSET JADE FIGURE OF A FISHERMAN QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
Оценка
40 00060 000
Лот продан 209,000 GBP (Цена продажи с учетом процента покупателя)
ПЕРЕЙТИ К ЛОТУ
154

THE FLEISHER COLLECTION OF JADES

A FINELY CARVED CELADON AND RUSSET JADE FIGURE OF A FISHERMAN QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
Оценка
40 00060 000
Лот продан 209,000 GBP (Цена продажи с учетом процента покупателя)
ПЕРЕЙТИ К ЛОТУ

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art

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Лондон

A FINELY CARVED CELADON AND RUSSET JADE FIGURE OF A FISHERMAN QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
finely and skilfully carved through the outer russet skin, the old fisherman seated cross legged holding a wicker basket and pair of fish, wearing a finely incised cape which wraps around his body, his smiling face with long beard and bushy eyebrows all topped by a straw hat, wood stand 
Количество: 2
10.5 cm, 4 1/8  in.
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Описание в каталоге

Jade carvings of fisherman are rare and examples of such large size and fine detailing are even rarer. The skill of the carver with its medium is evidenced in his ability to combine delicately incised details, as seen on the fisherman’s hat and shawl, with the bold lines that depict the folds his clothes and the naturalistic pose, with legs carved in the round. Furthermore, the skilful use of the natural russet skin of the stone draws attention to the carps and the shawl, highlighting the carver’s ability to minimise wastage of the precious stone. 

A similar carving of a seated fisherman, in the Tianjin Museum, Tianjin, is illustrated in Jade Wares Collection by Tianjin Museum, Beijing, 2012, pl. 202; another of smaller size, from the collection of Roger Chow, was included in the exhibition Exquisite Jade Carving, Art Gallery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 1995, cat. no. 40; and two carvings of standing fisherman were sold these rooms, the first, 11th November 1990, lot 64, and the second, 9th November 2005, lot 587. 

Fishermen represent one of the Four Basic Occupations, and have long been associated in Chinese folklore with the scholarly ideals of isolation and a simple life. The most famous scholar in Chinese mythology is Jiang Ziya (ca. 11th century BC), a military adviser to King Wen and King Wu of Zhou, who became a fisherman during his exile. Moreover, depictions of fisherman (yuweng) and carps (liyou) is homophonous with yuwen deli, a pun on the phrase ‘the fisherman received profit’.

Important Chinese Art

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Лондон