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PROPERTY OF THE 10TH BARON MONSON'S RESIDUARY TRUST

A George III rosewood, tulipwood and marquetry commode
circa 1775, attributed to Mayhew & Ince
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22

PROPERTY OF THE 10TH BARON MONSON'S RESIDUARY TRUST

A George III rosewood, tulipwood and marquetry commode
circa 1775, attributed to Mayhew & Ince
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Details & Cataloguing

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A George III rosewood, tulipwood and marquetry commode
circa 1775, attributed to Mayhew & Ince
the D-shaped top with a central rosette within interlaced bell flower garlands, above two faux fluted frieze drawers and bowed cupboard doors inlaid with a ribbon tied bell flower surrounded rosette, enclosing three long drawers, on squat tapering square legs, the reverse with a paper depository label for S & Co. in manuscript, Major Mansfield / September 19th 1864
91cm. high, 125cm. wide, 63.5cm. deep; 2ft. 11¾in., 4ft. 1¼in., 2ft. 1in.
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Происхождение

Major Mansfield, reputedly from a house at Hurlingham, Fulham, 1864;
Probably William, 7th Lord Monson, later 1st Viscount Oxenbridge PC (1829-1898);
Thence by descent

Описание в каталоге

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

Commodes of almost identical form to the present lot are illustrated in The Journal of the Furniture History Society, 1994, Hugh Roberts, `Nicely Fitted Up', Furniture for the 4th Duke of Marlborough, illustrated p.139; and
Christopher Claxton Stevens & Stewart Whittington, 18th Century English Furniture, The Norman Adams Collection, 1999, p.398.

The attribution of this commode - and other virtually identical examples - to the firm of Mayhew and Ince is based on stylistic grounds and in particular the similarity of the marquetry to earlier known examples of the firm’s output.

The firm of John Mayhew ( 1736-1811) and William Ince (d.1804) was one of the most successful and enduring partnerships of cabinet-makers in the 18th century. They are first recorded as partners in December 1758, advertising from an address at Broad Street in January 1759. Earlier Mayhew had been apprenticed to William Bradshaw, and Ince to John West, before forming a brief partnership after West`s death in 1758 with Samuel Norman and James Whittle. In 1763 they were described as `cabinet-makers, carvers and upholders’, and in 1778 `manufacturers of plate glass’ appeared on their bill heading. From 1780s the categories of `cabinet maker’ and upholsterer predominate, reflecting the change in taste from carved to veneered and inlaid furniture, which was more fashionable.

One of their early ventures was to publish The Universal System of Household Furniture in 1762 which included eighty-nine numbered plates and six smaller ones dedicated to 4th Duke of Marlborough. The relative failure of this work, which was issued in only one edition, was probably caused by the distinctly Rococo manner of the designs which was to become rapidly unfashionable in the next few years due to the rise of the neo classical taste reflected in the present commode. The partnership was quick to embrace these new forms as is shown by their own work and their involvement with Robert Adam himself in making furniture to his own designs for many of his important clients. Mayhew and Ince worked for many important patrons who included the Prince of Wales, 5th Duke of Devonshire, 5th Duke of Bedford and 1st Duke of Northumberland.

Particularly striking in the design of the present commode is the distinctive oval medallions, trailing husk motifs and fluting on the frieze which are all motifs which reflect the George III Roman fashion promoted by such architects as Robert Adam ( d.1792) and James Wyatt ( d.1813).This fluting also appears on a pair of commodes similarly attributed to Mayhew and Ince, sold Christie`s London 10th April 2003, which was attributed on the basis of other inlaid elements seen in these examples, also seen on other pieces known to be by the firm. The sparing use of inlay seen on these commodes is also seen with the present lot. The distinctive form of the husk inlay on the top of the present commodes is also of almost identical form to another commode also attributed to the firm, sold Christies London, 30th November 2000, lot 130, and the Marlborough Commodes, sold in these rooms, Sotheby’s, London, 3 December 2013, lot 353 (£200,000). These commodes, which contain inlaid elements known to have been used by the firm, also have an inlaid frieze similar to the present examples and are also of a similar distinctive D-shape.

The oval medallions on both doors derive from an engraving of the Sun God Apollo`s temple that was illustrated in Robert Wood`s Ruins of the Temple of Palmyra, 1753, which can also be seen on the aforementioned Marlborough Commodes and the doors of a bookcase, attributed to the firm with a tentative provenance of Warren Hastings at Daylesford House, Gloucestershire, offered by Christie`s London, Important English Furniture 9th June 2009, lot 219. The commission of the firm for Warren Hastings was one of the firm`s larger commissions and it would seem entirely likely that this cabinet was made by the firm and further supports the present attribution.

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