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PROPERTY OF AURORA TRUST

An important and rare Louis XV ormolu cartel clock, attributed to Charles Cressent

circa 1735, the dial and movement signed Pierre Le Roy a Paris, stamped with the "C" couronné poinçon

Оценка
80 000120 000
Лот продан 194,500 USD (Цена продажи с учетом процента покупателя)
ПЕРЕЙТИ К ЛОТУ
1

PROPERTY OF AURORA TRUST

An important and rare Louis XV ormolu cartel clock, attributed to Charles Cressent

circa 1735, the dial and movement signed Pierre Le Roy a Paris, stamped with the "C" couronné poinçon

Оценка
80 000120 000
Лот продан 194,500 USD (Цена продажи с учетом процента покупателя)
ПЕРЕЙТИ К ЛОТУ

Details & Cataloguing

Masterworks

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Нью-Йорк

An important and rare Louis XV ormolu cartel clock, attributed to Charles Cressent

circa 1735, the dial and movement signed Pierre Le Roy a Paris, stamped with the "C" couronné poinçon

Происхождение

Hamburger Frères, Paris 1914

Collection of Walter and Catalina von Pannwitz, Berlin and Heemstede

Описание в каталоге

The model of this cartel à tête d'Apollon is attributed to Charles Cressent (1685-1768), one of the most important furniture makers and fondeur-ciseleurs of the Régence and Louis XV eras, by Alexandre Pradère in Charles Cressent, Dijon, 2003, p. 298. Cressent is known to have executed a number of clock cases and in his 1749 sales records item 48 is described as

"No. 48. Une pendule en cartel, dont la face est de bronze, dorée d'or moulu, sur un fond de marquetry, au haut de laquelle est une tête d'Apollon couronnée de branches de laurier ; au bas du cadran, il y a un enfant qui tient un sable & montre l' heure du doigt... 780L ".

Eight years later his records include another, or possibly the same, clock with an almost identical description. Including the present lot, there are four known cartels à tête d'Apollon attributed to Cressent that are particularly close to the clock or clocks in design and size included in the above records. One, with he dial signed Julien Le Roy and formerly in the collection of the marquis d'Estampes; another signed Jean Baptiste Baillon and now lacking the ormolu branches; and one in a private collection in Turin, Italy, see ibid., p. 298, No. 219, 220 and 221, respectively. As the Apollo mask is noted to be crowned with a laurel wreath, the clock described is most likely either that from the d'Estampes collection or the one signed by Baillon. Similarly to the present clock, the clocks from the d'Estampes and Turin collections both include the same putti holding a chalice, are cast with identical lion masks and their dials are surrounded by rocaille-form cartouches. In fact, the two clocks are cast basically identically to the lot here. The differences between this clock and the two others are in the rendition of the Apollo masks and the ormolu foliage flanking the case. The Apollo mask mount of the d'Estampes clock is almost identical to the one seen on this lot and the foliage on the sides of Turin piece is very similar to the branches and leaves decorating this clock. With their height all at around 35 inches, the sizes of these three similar clocks are also almost the same as that of the lot here.

Charles Cressent (1685-1768)

The son of François Cressent, Sculpteur du Roi, Charles Cressent was born into a family of highly talented and successful craftsmen on December 16, 1685. He studied with André-Charles Boulle and, after marrying the widow of Joseph Poitou, ébéniste to the Regent, Philippe d'Orléans in 1719, he became one of the most sought-after furniture makers in Paris. He delivered pieces not only for French royalty and members of the high aristocracy such as the marquis de Marigny and the duc de Richelieu, but also to José I of Portugal and the Elector of Bavaria. He was one of the very few furniture makers who made his own ormolu mounts and managed to make a profitable career not only as ébéniste but also as fondeur-ciseleur. As noted above, records show that he executed a number of clock cases. He did not outsource any of the work related to manufacturing his clock cases and guarded his innovative designs with great care from other makers such as François Goyer, who were sometimes caught plagiarizing the works of the leading craftsmen of the day, such as Cressent himself.

Pierre II Le Roy (1687-1762)

The brother of master clockmaker Julien II Le Roy, Pierre II Le Roy was trained by his father Pierre I Julien Le Roy and was received as master on October 30, 1721 by decree of July 27, 1721 exempting him from lack of apprenticeship. A member of the Société des Arts, he presented innovations on four occasions to the Académie des Sciences, including a clock showing true time and an equation circle. Besides Charles Cressent, he supplied movements to the finest bronziers such as Saint-Germain and Caffieri, among others. Due to the excellence and preciseness of his movements and the fine quality of the luxurious cases in which his clocks were set, Le Roy's works were owned by the most exclusive clientele, such as the royal Garde-Meuble, the prince de Condé and the maréchal-duc de Richelieu.   

Masterworks

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