634
634
Zao Wou-Ki (Zhao Wuji)
PINS LANDAIS
Оценка
3 200 0004 000 000
Лот продан 23,060,000 HKD (Цена продажи с учетом процента покупателя)
ПЕРЕЙТИ К ЛОТУ
634
Zao Wou-Ki (Zhao Wuji)
PINS LANDAIS
Оценка
3 200 0004 000 000
Лот продан 23,060,000 HKD (Цена продажи с учетом процента покупателя)
ПЕРЕЙТИ К ЛОТУ

Details & Cataloguing

Zao Wou-Ki (Zhao Wuji)
B. 1921
PINS LANDAIS
signed in pinyin and Chinese and dated 55 (lower right); signed in pinyin, titled and dated 1955 (reverse). Kleeman Galleries label affixed to the stretcher (reverse)
Executed in 1955
oil on canvas
100.3 by 81 cm.; 39 1/2 by 31 7/8 in.
Прочитать о состоянии предмета Прочитать о состоянии предмета

Происхождение

Kleeman Galleries, New York
Private American Collection

Описание в каталоге

Completed in 1955, Pins Landais is highly representative of the artist's style from the mid-1950s.  In this work, Zao Wou-ki uses peaceful, dark green tones inspired by ancient bronze vessels. Although an oil painting, the artist has recreated the tonal variations and blurred quality usually achieved by the medium of ink.  Within the movements of the black lines, Zao has sketched symbolic motifs to describe his own perception of reality in combination with his imagination. The composition includes centralized tangible forms: the flowing babble of a stream, a figure riding a horse and hovering birds flying freely around a bright moon; the artist has left ample space for the viewer's exploration and interpretation.    

The name of this painting, Pins Landais, refers to a province in South-West France called Landes.  This area is rich in fertile soil and has abundant pasture land for livestock farming as well as a large number of pine trees.  This naturally beautiful landscape has inspired many writers, for example the famous author and Nobel Prize for Literature laureate, François Mauriac, who based many of his own novels in the landscapes of Landes.  It is possible that Pins Landais was inspired by Zao's travels in this region, the natural beauty of the landscape urging him to paint.

In the green wilderness of this painting, Zao has cleverly incorporated a contrasting red colour, combining this with the frenetic symbols seen in the black lines of the composition and bringing the whole painting to life. As Henri Michaux once said, they are "half revealed, yet hidden; seemingly broken, yet the lines are connected in unison, depicting the pulse of his whimsical thoughts. Suddenly, the particular atmosphere of a provincial Chinese village appears in the composition. It is a joyful pleasure to watch and somewhat comical, brought together in a combination of symbolic motifs."[1]  Each time the viewer sees this painting, they are met with a new and fresh feeling; one is left deeply fascinated by the charm and mystery of this work.  

[1]  Zao Wou-ki, François Marquet, Zao Wou-ki Biography, Artist's Publishing Society, 1992, p.103

20th Century Chinese Art

|
Гонконг