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PROPERTY FROM A PROMINENT SOUTH AMERICAN COLLECTION

Emiliano di Cavalcanti
(1897-1967)
FIGURAS COM BANDOLIM, CORUJA E GATOS
Stima
350.000450.000
Lotto. Venduto 466,000 USD (Prezzo di aggiudicazione con commissione d'acquisto)
VAI AL LOTTO
57

PROPERTY FROM A PROMINENT SOUTH AMERICAN COLLECTION

Emiliano di Cavalcanti
(1897-1967)
FIGURAS COM BANDOLIM, CORUJA E GATOS
Stima
350.000450.000
Lotto. Venduto 466,000 USD (Prezzo di aggiudicazione con commissione d'acquisto)
VAI AL LOTTO

Details & Cataloguing

Latin America: Modern Art | Latin America: Contemporary Art

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New York

Emiliano di Cavalcanti
(1897-1967)
FIGURAS COM BANDOLIM, CORUJA E GATOS
signed lower right
oil and graphite on canvas
57 3/4 by 38 1/2 in.
147 by 98 cm
Painted circa 1950.
Leggi la scheda di conservazione Leggi la scheda di conservazione

Provenienza(e)

Hélio Pereira Bicudo, São Paulo
Private Collection, São Paulo

Esposizione

São Paulo, Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo, Retrospectiva de di Cavalcanti, 1971

Nota a catalogo

A foundational figure of Brazilian modernism and its key event, the renowned Semana de Arte Moderna de São Paulo (1922), Emiliano di Cavalcanti (1897-1967) personified the avant garde in his native Rio de Janeiro. Keenly aware of European art through an extensive network of fellow artists that included: Braque, Cocteau, Léger, Matisse, and of course, Picasso, di Cavalcanti blended Cubism, Fauvism and Picasso's Neoclassicism of the 1920s into an extravagantly colorful--if determinedly more conservative style. Sensuous mulata women, carnival scenes, poor fishermen, and social outcasts were among di Cavalcanti's most favored themes. Together they embody an enduring territory of recognizable characters, situations, and traditions co-existing within the structural complexities of a culture distinctly aware of its social and racial disparities.

Figuras com bandolim, coruja e gatos marks an interesting departure from Di Cavalcanti's prototypical imagery. A large-scale and delightfully accomplished interpretation of the Commedia dell'Arte, Figuras com bandolim, coruja e gatos evokes Picasso's Three Musicians of 1921, an icon of Synthetic Cubism and part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Like its predecessor, the present painting evokes three figures whose schematic appearance resembles that of magazine cut outs. Harmoniously rendered in chromatic and earthy tones of deep browns and celestial blues, their quasi-bodies disintegrate against the forceful outline imposed on their own angular shapes. 

At the center, we recognize a mandolin, key protagonist of the composition. Tenderly carried by the largest figure, it quickly demands to be reconstructed and assimilated as a musical instrument. Above it, we encounter its owner's visage capriciously distorted into a self-reflective gaze. To its left, a curious blue owl securely perched on a figure's shoulder, meets the viewer with a frontal caricature stance. Here as in other Cubist works, we are asked to reconstruct both subject and space by comparing shapes and forms to determine what each one represents. Through this process, we the viewer participate in a private adventure to decode meaning. Painted in the early 1950s, Figuras com bandolim, coruja e gatos confirms di Cavalcanti's commitment for merging the carioca spirit, its people and traditions, into the avant garde aesthetic.

Latin America: Modern Art | Latin America: Contemporary Art

|
New York