45
45
Rufino Tamayo
(1899-1991)
EL JUGLAR
Stima
700.000900.000
Lotto. Venduto 850,000 USD (Prezzo di aggiudicazione con commissione d'acquisto)
VAI AL LOTTO
45
Rufino Tamayo
(1899-1991)
EL JUGLAR
Stima
700.000900.000
Lotto. Venduto 850,000 USD (Prezzo di aggiudicazione con commissione d'acquisto)
VAI AL LOTTO

Details & Cataloguing

Latin America: Modern Art | Latin America: Contemporary Art

|
New York

Rufino Tamayo
(1899-1991)
EL JUGLAR
signed and dated O-82 upper right; also titled and dated 1982 on the reverse
oil and sand on canvas
52 by 39 in.
132 by 99 cm
Leggi la scheda di conservazione Leggi la scheda di conservazione

We wish to thank Juan Carlos Pereda for his kind assistance in the cataloguing of this work.

Provenienza(e)

Collection of Olga and Rufino Tamayo, Mexico City
Collection of Máximo Perdomo, Mexico City
Sale: Sotheby's, New York, Latin American Art, June 3, 1999, lot 9, illustrated in color
Private Collection, New York

Esposizione

Mexico City, Museo de Arte Contemporáneo Internacional Rufino Tamayo, Rufino Tamayo Setenta años de Creación, December 1987 - March 1988

Bibliografia

N. Piamonte, "Entrevista con Rufino Tamayo," Viva el Arte Revista Latinoamericana de Artes Plásticas, 1988, p.16, illustrated

Nota a catalogo

Jugglers, minstrels and acrobats are among Rufino Tamayo's most cherished subjects. Acting as visual pretexts, they demonstrate the artist's exceptional ability to synthesize the human body into positions of great plasticity; postures evoking impossibly contorted movements. Painted in 1982, The Juggler is caught in the act of balancing three bowling pins simultaneously flying in space only to fall into his hands in an eternal motion. Frontal and delightfully playful, the figure is silhouetted against the mistiness of an atmosphere of opulent and subtle ranges of blues and mauves displaying Tamayo's expertise for depicting warmth and sumptuousness. 

With the grace of a dancer and the energy of an athlete, this Saltimbanque displays gestures that serve to subtly counterbalance the static nature of two dimensional planes. In the evanescent mist background, floating small patches of color enhance the visual atmosphere supporting the acrobatic leap. The elegant but vital contrast of harmonic colors, makes a subtle distinction between his clothes and the floor on which he performs. His facial expression reveals the concentration required of him while recalling a prehispanic mask. The present work, executed when the artist was eighty-three, eloquently affirms the pictorial achievement of his mature age.

On the other side, The Juggler exudes energy and vitality, as if it had been painted by an artist in the prime of his youth. These technical and conceptual motifs--only achieved in his later years--allowed Tamayo to reach a virtuosity through apparently simple yet fully accomplished compositions. 

Juan C. Pereda

Latin America: Modern Art | Latin America: Contemporary Art

|
New York