174
174
Kikuyu Shield, Kenya
Stima
25.00035.000
Lotto. Venduto 31,250 USD (Prezzo di aggiudicazione con commissione d'acquisto)
VAI AL LOTTO
174
Kikuyu Shield, Kenya
Stima
25.00035.000
Lotto. Venduto 31,250 USD (Prezzo di aggiudicazione con commissione d'acquisto)
VAI AL LOTTO

Details & Cataloguing

African, Oceanic and Pre-Columbian Art

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New York

Kikuyu Shield, Kenya

Provenienza(e)

Leendert van Lier, Amsterdam
Christie's Amsterdam, African, Oceanic, and Indonesian Art from the van Lier Collection, April 15, 1997, lot 70
Kevin Conru, London
Private American Collection, acquired from the above

Bibliografia

Jean-Baptiste Bacquart, The Tribal Arts of Africa, New York, 1998, p. 211, pl. C
Jean-Baptiste Bacquart, The Tribal Arts of Africa: Surveying Africa's Artistic Geography, London, 1998, p. 211, pl. C, and back cover
Kevin Conru, African and Oceanic Art, Brussels, 2004, pp. 20-21

Nota a catalogo

Regarding a closely related Kikuyu shield from the Ginzberg Collection (sold at Sotheby's Paris, September 10, 2007, lot 5), Maina (in Phillips 1995: 62-63) notes: "Among the Kikuyu in central Kenya, as in many parts of Africa, initiation is--or has been--a significant spur to artistic activity.  [...] In the early 1900s, initiation shields were of various kinds; unlike war shields (ngo), which were crafted from animal hide, they were made of wood or bark.  Those of the type shown here were usually carved from a solid piece of light wood by specialist craftsmen for a display of dance known as muumburo.  [...] All wood shields were decorated with nonfigurative motifs on the outer surface and usually on the inside as well.  These designs were by no means arbitrary.  The patterining had to be agreed upon in advance of each initiation, and then applied on to the surface of the shields to be used on that particular occasion.  Such patterning varied both by territorial unit and initiation period.  Shields used at the same iniatiaton were not necessarily identical.  Boys usually passed their dance shields on to their younger relatives."

African, Oceanic and Pre-Columbian Art

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New York